EXECUTIVE SUITES

AOL Names Technology Chief

Time Warner's America Online unit said it named Maureen Govern, formerly of Convergys, as its chief technology officer.

Govern will manage the Internet company's network, including infrastructure and data center operations and direct technological development. She succeeds John A. McKinley Jr., who was promoted to run AOL's digital services business last fall.

Microsoft Executives Get Raises

Microsoft gave raises to Chairman Bill Gates and chief executive Steve Ballmer, as well as three presidents promoted last week in a company-wide reshuffle. Gates and Ballmer each will receive a $620,000 annual salary, up from $600,000. The executives also received bonuses of $400,000 in the year ended June 30.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

Nokia to Sell BlackBerry-Enabled Phone

Research in Motion, maker of the BlackBerry e-mail pager, will let Nokia become the first handset maker to use its e-mail software in the United States. Nokia, the world's largest maker of mobile phones, will sell a BlackBerry-enabled handset, which has a full keyboard, through Cingular Wireless starting in November, the companies said. Cingular will sell the phone, which flips open to reveal a screen and keyboard, for as little as $299.99 with a two-year contract.

INTERNET

Patent Office Rejects Microsoft Challenge

Microsoft's bid to invalidate a Web applications patent was dealt a setback after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office upheld the patent, owned by the University of California. The university sued Microsoft in 1999 for infringing on the patent, which permits the use of interactive applications such as looking at merchandise on different Web pages. In 2003, a federal jury in Chicago found that Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser infringed on the patent, awarding damages of $521 million to the university and closely held Eolas Technologies, which licenses the technology.

Research In Motion said its second-quarter profit rose 57 percent, to $111.1 million from $70.6 million in the year-ago period. But subscriber additions missed some analysts' estimates, and the company's shares fell. Sales rose to $490.1 million from $310.2 million.

Compiled from staff and news service reports.