This is really a story about overindulgence.

The story has its roots in the first time two dozen of us ever tasted the devil chocolate and found ourselves enthralled.

It ends one recent weekend evening, on a quiet suburban street, in an orgy of chocolate that must have surpassed even the wildest childhood dreams of the Chocolate 24: Chocolate mousses, charlottes and souffles, chocolate ice cream, brownies, cakes and pies. Even a chocolate hors d'oeuvre and entree.

The only thing missing was chocolate fudge.

For propriety's sake, the evening was called a "chocolate fstival," the object being for everyone to bring his or her favorite chocolate creation and share it with everyone else.

But as I stood behind the dessert table at the climax of the evening, helping everyone to a bit of everything from chocolate cornucopia, it was obvious that the event had struck a primal chord: Passion.

Take my own passon, for instance. One of my earliest memories is of my grandfather handing me a Milky Way when I started to cry in a grocery store. I stopped crying.

It was in the midst of one of my passionate assaults on the local ice cream store this spring that the idea for the chocolate festival was born. I'd already made up my mind I wanted two scoops of chocolate fudge ice cream (the chocolaties flavor). But as I waited for my turn to order, I saw others being served chocolate sundaes, chocolate chip cones, and chocolate ice cream sandwiches.

Why I wondered, devouring each in my mind as it was ordered, couldn't I have a bit of each for myself?

What chocolate lover has not asked him or herself that same question? When you were more independent as a teen-ager with your own allowance, you had to worry about pimples.

"Now that you're fat anyway," said my wife when I broached the party idea, "why not?"

We were on.

Invitations were sent out to known chocolatics. All were asked to clear their desserts through me in advance to avoid duplication.

By the time everyone arrived, a three-course meal of chocolate-related dishes had been assembled. One guest brought an original hors d'oeurve au chocolat that took the guests by storm. Based on a Samosas recipe from India and described by one guest as "an Indian ravioli," it consisted of a meat-and-spices mixture - mildly seasoned with chocolate - that was wrapped in a whole wheat crust and fried. The Samosa-Judi (as it shall be known henceforth) was then dipped by partygoers into a tart mixture of yogurt and chocolate.

Another guest provided the main course of mole poblano , a traditional Mexican dish of turkey stewed in herbs and vegetables with a dash of chocolate thrown in. The mole was served on steamed tortillas with shredded lettuce and sliced cucumbers, and everything was washed down with chilled Mexican beer.

By the time the last of the mole had been cleared away, all heads were turned towards the dessert table.

"We've got to take a picture," shouted one guest, as his eyes swept across the chocolate vista.

"I'm going to O.C.," groaned another, making a play on the abbreviation O.D. - for overdose.

It was truly awesome. There was a chocolate chip pecan pie and a chocolate pound cake. There were two kinds of ice cream: Gifford's coffee-chocolate chip and Haagen-Dazs chocolate. There was a chocolate charlottee and a cold chocolate souffle.

In the center of the table were four different mousses, ranging from a "plain" mousse au chocolat with whipped cream to one made with cognac and another with an Italian meringue base. The most popular was one covered with a brownie-like shell.

The eager faces pressed closer. There was a chocolate piece called a pave - smooth chocolate beaten for 20 minutes in a mixer and then topped with creme de cacao topped with fresh cream; even a tin of Sarah Lee brownies.

To wash it all down and cleanse the palate bottled water was provided.

Within a half hour it was over. Stupified guests, engorged with chocolate, sat catatonic. Finally one guest roused herself enough to demand an annual meeting of Les Chevaliers de Chocolat .

"But next year," she said."Let's make it a strawberry festival." PAVE DES DUCS HOTEL DU LION D'OR (8 to 10 servings) 8 ounces semi-sweet chocolate 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened 4 eggs, separated 2/3 cup superfine sugar Pinch salt Sweet almond oil

Heat chocolate on an ovenproof plate in a very slow oven (125 degrees) for 20 minutes, or until it is melted but not runny.

In the bowl of an electric combine the chocolate with the softened butter. Beat in the egg yolks, one at a time, beating well after each addition and add the sugar. Continue to beat the mixture at high speed for 20 minutes.

In another bowl beat egg whites with pinch of salt until they hold stiff peaks. Stir 1/4 of the whites into the chocolate mixture, and fold in the remaining whites gently but thoroughly. Transfer the mixture to an 8-inch-square baking pan, lightly greased with sweet almond oil, and freeze it overnight.

To serve, dip the pan in warm water for 2 or 3 seconds and invert a serving plate over it. Invert the pave with a sharp rap onto the plate and serve it with custard cream. MOLE POBLANO (10 servings) 8 to 9 pound turkey, cut into pieces 2 gallons water 2 onions, quartered 3 cloves garlic 3 carrots, cut into large pieecs 4 ribs celery with leaves, cut into large pieces 2 tablespoons salt 12 whole peppercorns SAUCE: 6 cups turkey stock 1 green pepper, blanched and seeded 2 ancho chilies, blanched and seeded 1 jalapeno chili, blanched and seeded 2 dried red chilies, soaked in hot water and seeded 1 medium onion, coarsely chopped 1 clove garlic 1/2 teaspoon anise seed 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon powerded cloves 3 tablespoons bacon drippings 1 medium onion, minced 6 tomatoes, peeled and seeded 1 square unsweetened chocolate Sesmae seeds

Place the turkey in a large soup pot with the water, onions, garlic, carrots, celery, salt and peppercorns. Bring to a rolling boil and skim the foam which rises to the top. Reduce the heat to medium and continue to summer the turkey for 2 hours. Remove the turkey to a bowl and allow the meat to cool to room temperature. Strain the stock through a cheesecloth and reduce it by about half. What remains should be about 2 to 2 1/2 quarts of rich turkey stock.

Meanwhile, blanch the peppers and puree them with 2 cups stock, coarsley chopped onion, garlic, anise, cinnamon and cloves in a blender. Do this in several batches, transfering the puree to a separate container.

In a heavy skillet melt the bacon drippings over low heat and cook the minced onion until it starts to turn golden. Cut the tomatoes into small pieces and add them to the skillet along with 1 cup of turkey stock. Simmer for 5 minutes. Add the pureed mixture to the skillet and bring to a slow simmer. Reduce heat to low and add the chocolate, stirring constantly until the chocolate is dissolved. Remove the sauce from the flame.

Pull the turkey meat from the bones, using your hands, and break it into pieces about 3-by-1-by-1/2-inch thick and arrange the meat in layers in a large ovenproof casserole dish. Pour enough of the remaining turkey stock over the meat to bring the liquid to half cover the meat. Pour the sauce from the skillet over the casserole and bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour, covered. Remove cover, sprinkle casserole with sesame seeds and return to oven for 15 minutes. Serve hot with corn tortillas, fresh scallions and shredded lettuce and a side dish of refritos.