"Aspen," a six-hour miniseries that starts tonight at 9 on Channel 4, is another NBC homage to sexual kinkery - just as trashy and probably destined to be as popular with audiences as the network's recent "79 Park Avenue."

The drama, which will air at 9 through Monday night, is loosely based on a perfectly dreadful novel of the same name, written by Burt Hirschfield tow years ago.

Unfortunately for Hirschfield's bid for cinematic immortality, NBC bought the screen rights before Claudine Longet put the Colorado ski resort town on national TV last spring with her sensational murder trial (and the whispers of even more sensational gossip.)

So NBC went out and bought another book called "The Adversay," which had a sensational murder trial, and the result is now a perfectly dreadful TV-movie all on its own.

In its hurry to get the show on the tube before memories of Longet and the late Spider Sabich had disappeared from the forefront of the viewing public's consciousness, NBC spent an extra $300,000 for sets and soap flakes so "Aspen" could be taped in Los Angeles last summer.

Except for a couple of long shots of the ski slopes of Ajax Mountain, it was all done on sound stages - and it shows.

The story is silly enough to be Aspen-true. Done in flashbacks, it's about a youthful gigolo (Perry King) who follows the spoiled daughter (Michelle Phillips) of "the man who owns the world" (Gene Barry) from Mexico to the Rockies. Her billionaire daddy plans to wreck the mountain environmental with his plans for a vast recreation center.

Gigolo runs across an old wartime buddy (Bo Hopkins) who works for the local gangster (Tony Franciosa, teeth and all), and gets a job trucking live lobsters into a town from Denver.

Tony's character, by the way, has a round-the-clock cocaine party going in his downtown Aspen pad. He is one bad cat and a natural ally of the rapacious billionaire who stops at nothing to get his way.

But Hark! Bo has a 15-year-old girl friend who seduces Perry the night Michelle stands him up on a marriage promise. So, Bo, understandably, takes her out and beats her to death while Perry sleeps if off in the front seat of the old Corvette.

What follows Sunday and Monday nights is a "sensational" murder trial (with John Houseman and Sam Elliott defending Perry), Perry's trip to the Death House, and Sam's eight-year fight to free him. Sam is the hero of "Aspen."

The resolute decadence of the characters who inhabit "Aspen" is not without parallels in that jet-setty community, of course.

There were doing coke by the cups-ful in the sahdow of Ajax long before network TV disovered the stuff. And there have been more than a few brutal murders in the Roaring Fork Valley over the years, too. And the Mob.

Even so, "Aspen" is just a tad overdrawn. After a winter without snow and the Longet trial, that resort town needs NBC's characterization of it the way it needs Vail.

But it is kind of fun.