Sure is nice to have Jane Fonda around giving us an alternative to the macho Western about the tough rancher who can't show emotion for anything except The Land, having been once betrayed by a kiss-and-tell bitch, but who softens just a little - not enough to change that basic indestructible. soul - from the love and loyalty of a gentle person.

In "Comes a Horseman," Jane Fonda plays a tough rancher who can't show emotion for anything except The Land, having been once betrayed by a kiss-and-tell bitch played by Jason Robards, but who softens just a little from the love and loyalty of a gentle person, played by James Caan.

Aside from this novelty, the picture is about as arid an outdoor drama as you are likely to find anywhere. Nobody says anything much; the rancher has even thrown out the wall clock because it was making too much of a racket.

The philosophy of the picture is somewhat unclear. It seems that in the 1940s, cattle-raising was considered a noble profession, even for those whose cattle keep getting lost in the trees (that is correct - Fonda and her hired hands are chasing cows out of forests for a good 60 per cent of the footage), but discovering oil on your land was considered a disgrace. Burning down other people's houses with them inside was considered bad, and building houses up again was considered good.

Sure was funny times.

COMES A HORSEMAN - Beacon Mall, Bradwick, Carrollin K-B Carberus, Laural Cinema, Tramples, Wheaton Plaza, White Flint.