Twelve years after its predecessor drew the blueprint for the current systems, a second Carnegie Commission on the Future of Public Broadcasting has "reluctantly" found that system "fundamentally flawed" and recommends a major restructuring both in funding and organization.

In a report to be issued today after an 18-month study, the Commission would:

Increase funding for public television and radio to $1.2 billion by 1985, some of which could be raised through a novel "spectrum fee" requiring licensed users of the broadcast spectrum, including commercial networks, to pay for its use.

Replace the current Corporation for Public Broadcasting with a private, non-profit Public Telecommunications Trust, governed by nine presidentially-appointed trustees with staggered, non-renewable nine-year terms.

Establish a "highly-insulated" new Program Services Endowment within the Trust "whose exclusive function [would be] to foster and support creative excellence in the communications arts," underwriting radio and TV productions, programs services and research.

The Endowment would be governed by 15 directors, serving three-year terms, to be chosen by the board of the Trust.

Increase the availability of national TV programming and federal funding for local "regional and special-interest consortia" of "existing and newly-developing broadcast stations."

Double the number of existing radio stations by 1985.

This could mean as many as 300 new public radio stations, many of them run by minorities.

The commission also recommended that a system-wide effort be made to increase the number of women and minorities in public broadcasting and to make the network more accountable to the public.

These recommendations for revamping the system are aimed in part at eliminating the conflict that has continually existed between the CPB and the Public Broadcasting Service over the control of TV programming since public broadcasting was created by Congress in 1967.

According to the report, "the existing configuration of national organizations makes it almost impossible for the system to meet legitimate expectations of the Amercan public, to resist inappropriate pressures, or to provide conditions under which creative achievement in programming will be sustained."

The 17-member Carnegie Commission-did not suggest a formula for the "spectrum fee," but said it could be expected to raise $150 to $200 million, perhaps considerably less, by 1985.

Of the $1.2 billion called for by that year, the report forecast that traditional non-federal sources -- viewers private business, state and local government -- would provide some $570 million by the mid-1980s, as compared to $356 million from those sources in 1977.

The federal government, the panel said, would match the money raised locally, by a formula of $1 in federal funds for every $1.50 raised. (The current formula is due to become one-to-two.) That would result in an estimated $380 million in federal monies by 1985.

Congress set aside $135 million in 1977, $152 million in 1980 and has approved an appropriation of $200 million by 1982.

The commission also recommended a one-time, $350-million appropriation for capital development over a five-to-seven year period.

The 408-page report, called "A Public Trust: The Report of the Carnegie Commission on the Future of Public Broadcasting," comes at a time when Congress is considering a complete revision of the Communications Act of 1934.

Rep. Lionel Van Deerlin (D-Calif.), chairman of the House communications subcommittee, is one of several congressional leaders, who have indicated they will give serious consideration to the Commission's recommendation.

Chairman of what has been dubbed "Carnegie Commission II" is Dr. William J. McGill, president of Columbia University.

Other members include Stphen K. Bailey, president of the National Academy of Education; Red Burns of New York University; Henry Cauthen of the South Carolina Educational Television Network; Peggy Charren, president of Action for Children's Television; and Wilbur Davenport of MIT.

Other members are Virginia Duncan of the CPB board; Eli N. Evans, president of the Charles H. Revson Foundation; John Gardenr, founder of Common Cause, author Alex Haley; Walter Heller, former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers; and Josie Johnson, member of the National Public Radio board.

Also serving on the Commission are Kenneth Mason, president of the Quaker Oats Co.; Bill Moyers of WNET in New York; Kathleen Nolan, president of the Screen Actors Guild; Leonard Reinsch, chairman of the board of Cox Broadcasting Corporation and Tomas Rivera, executive vice president of the University of Texas at El Paso.

New Poaching at ABD?

We hear that CBS News president Richard S. Salant sent a rocket to ABS News president Roone Arledge yesterday... charging the unauthorized use on the ABC World News Tonight of a CBS satellite feed last Thursday of material taped on Pope John Paul II's plane while it was en route from Rome to Santo Domingo...

Salant reportedly has demanded an ABC apology on the air ("at the earliest date following receipt of this telegram") and a statement... also to be read on ABC World News Tonight... that "ABC regrets its unauthorized use" of the CBS material...

According to an industry source, the on-plane material was seen on all three (6 p.m., 6:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.) feeds of the ABC World News Tonight last Thursday...

However, this source says, CBS News was the only network with electronic news-gathering equipment aboard the pope's plane that could have enabled the pictures to be sent via satellite to New York when the plane landed...

Salant's telegram to Arledge "strongly protested" the use of the CBS material and "demanded that it not recur"... according to our sources...

Late yesterday, a spokesman for ABC News said that there would be no comment because the telegram hadn't been received yet...

And Tempers Were Rising

Out at 20th Cnetury Fox Television in Hollywood yesterday, too... as the word got around that NBC president Fred Silverman has dropped a multi-million-dollar project called "The Yazzier"... whch was envisioned as an American Indian equivalent of "Roots"...

In the works for two years... NBC had already invested $250,000 in script development for the 16-hour mini series... and some sources say the five scripts on hand (including several by Budd Schulberg) were some of the best TV in recent memory...

But in a Jan. 16 letter to 20th Century Fox TV senior vice-president David Sontag... who had begun development of "The Yazzies" before joining the production firm... Silverman said the mini-series no longer fit into NBC's programming plans...

Sontag said yesterday that his subsequent attempts to talk to Silverman about the project have been unsuccessful and that CBS Television has also since turned "The Yazzies" down... because, officially, "the network didn't know how to program it" and, unofficially, according to Sontag, "they didn't watn to take an NBC project over"...

Sontag, who created "The Paper Chase" and "James at 16" for TV, said that "I recognize that NBC right now needs regular series for the schedule... but I asked for a chance to meet with Fred because I think there are certain things that television should do to rise above itself in broadcasting..."

Sontag told us he had hoped that NBC would at least do eight hours of the series ("sort of like a 'Roots I'")... at a cost of some $1.7 million per two-hour segment... and then, if it succeeded, complete the series...

"The Yazzies" would have been the story of a finctional Navajo family from 1860 until the present... and, Sontag said, members of the Southwest tribe would have been used extensively on both the production and acting sides of the project... with the full cooperation of the Navajo Nation...

Sontag said yesterday he hopes to contact ABC executives this week to see if the development project can still be saved...

Deanne Barkley... NBC vice-president for motion pictures and mini-series... yesterday challenged Sontag's statements...

"We would have done 'The Yazzies' at a certain length... I wanted seven to eight hours... but they wanted it at 14 to 16 hours... and it's certainly dead at 16.

"I also understand," said Barkley, "that David has told others that Fred had promised quality TV for NBC and that his cancellation of this series seems to contradict this...

"I'd like to challenge that... we have 'Studs Lonigan'... 'The Martian Chronicles'... 'Brave New World' and 'Shogun' in development and they're all quality..."

Most of the above, she pointed out, are shorter than eight hours... although "Shogun" will be 12 hours long...

Tiptoeing Right Along

NBC correspondent Bob Hager (exChannel 4) and two members of his camera crew... both French... were roughed up yesterday in Tehran in an altercation involving a soldier and two civilians...

Nobody was seriously injured, but the sound man received a back injury and the cameraman a gash over his eye...

And still ANOTHER unsettling item... this time from the Roper Reports people... who say that a poll of 2,001 married people showed that the choice of TV programs in the home was the leading cause of marital disputes...

Twenty-five percent of the couples polled rated TV the top cause of marital disagreements among 15 potential arguing points listed...

How to discipline the kiddies was second with 23 percent... while how often to entertain at home was the least cited cause of fights... by just six percent...

And Finally

ABC Enterainment has announced some limited series (maybe four or five episodes each) for the spring... and they include some familiar stuff...

"Doctors' Private Lives"... which got a 31 share last year as a TV movie, gets a chance in a series... "Julie Farr, MD"... comes back for six more shows... "Wonderland Cove" with Clu Galager and some "loveable orphans" (who drew a 29 share in the movie "Stickin' Together") will return, as will "Friends," about three youngsters -- two white and one black -- growing up in an urban neighborhood...

Also in development at ABC... a pilot called "Lazarus Syndrome" with Lou Gossett set as the top doctor in a big city hopital...

ABC announced that "Ike: The War Years" the six-hour mini-series... airs in May...