Another butter blunder (May 31) was in Very Rich Cream Cheese Cake recipe in Joan Nathan's story on Shavuoth. It should have read: With a pastry blender cut 3/4 cup of butter until crumbly. VERY RICH CREAM CHEESE CAKE 1 1/2 cups sifted flour 6 tablespoons plus 1 3/4 cups sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons grated lemon peel 3/4 cup butter 4 egg yolks and 4 whole eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 4 packages (8-ounce size) soft cream cheese 1 cup finely grated, very sharp natural cheddar cheese 1/2 teaspoon grated orange peel 1/4 cup beer 1/4 cup heavy cream In a medium bowl, combine the flour, 6 tablespoons of the sugar and 1 teaspoon of the lemon peel. With a pastry blender cut in the butter until crumbly. Then, with a fork, stir in 2 of the egg yolks and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla to form a dough. Refrigerate 30 minutes. Press 1/3 of the chilled dough into the bottom of a 9-inch spring-form pan. Bake 8 to 10 minutes in a 400-degree overn until golden brown. Cool. Press rest of dough around side of pan to within 1 inch of the top. In a large bowl with the mixer going at high speed, beat the cream cheese until fluffy. Gradually add the cheddar cheese, beating until well blended - about 5 minutes. Combine the remaining 1 3/4 cups sugar, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon vanilla, remaining 1/2 teaspoon lemon peel and the orange peel. Add gradually to the cheese mixture, beating until smooth. Then add the 4 whole eggs and the 2 remaining yolks one at a time, beating well after each addition. Stir in the beer and cream. Pour the mixture into the spring form. Bake in a 500-degree oven 10 to 20 minutes or until the top is light brown. Reduce the heat to 250 degrees and continue baking 2 hours or until the top is firm and cake tester inserted in the center comes out firm. CAPTION: (NEW-LINE)Illustration, no caption

Cheese dishes are traditionally served at Shavuoth, the Jewish Feast of Weeks, which begins this evening and lasts for two days.

Shavuoth was celebrated first as the completion of the barley harvest, with the sacrificial offering of the first fruits at the Temple in Jerusalem. Later it came to honor the giving of the Ten Commandments from Mount Sinai.

Of course, butter -churning and cheesemaking are common features of harvest festivals the world over because in late spring goats, sheep and cows find better grass for grazing and begin to produce more milk.

But Jewish scholars and rabbis discovered additional explanations. In Psalm 68, for example, Mount Sinai has six different names, one of which is Har Gavnunim . "Gavnunim," which means gibbous or many-peaked, has the same root as the Hebrew word for cheese, "gevinah." A mountain of cheese.

Two other explanations of the symbolism derive from the story of the Israelites' three-day wait for Moses to come down with the Ten Commandments. When they finally returned to their camp, they found that their milk had turned sour - the first stage in making cheese. According to another rabinical source, the Israelites fasted while they were gone and returned so hungry that they drank milk immediately rather than go through the long process of preparing a meat meal.

The dairy dishes evolved through the centuries. Before 1900, poor Eastern European Jews, like Tevya, the milkman immortalized in Sholom Aleichem's "Fiddler on the Roof," made and sold their own milk and milk products.The cream which rose to the top of milk containers was allowed to sour, used to make a topping for potatoes, or mixed with borscht. The remainder was left standing, and by the fourth day formed sour milk which was eaten with potatoes or drunk cold. It was also used to prepare a cheese similar to our cottage, pot or farmer's, from which many delicacies, especially blintzes, were made for Shavuoth.

Today dishes that once were available only seasonally can be eaten throughout the year. Here are some favorites.

CHEESE BLINTZES

(Makes 14 to 16)

Blintz: 2 cups milk 1 slightly beaten egg 1 tablespoon cooking oil 2 teaspoons brandy 1 1/4 cups flour 1/4 teaspoon salt

Filling: 1 cup cream cheese 1/2 cup cottage cheese, drained, or farmer's cheese 1 egg, slightly beaten 1 tablespoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Combine the milk, egg, cooking oil and brandy. Sift the flour together with the salt and add to the milk mixture. Beat well until smooth.

Grease a 6-inch frying pan by putting a little oil on a paper napkin and wiping the pan lightly, bottom and sides. When the skillet is at 375 degrees, pour a small amount of batter over the surface of the pan, tilting immediately so that the batter covers the surface evenly but thinly.When large bubbles appear on surface of pancake and edges pull away slightly, run a spatula around the edge and turn the pancake over. Cook other side for about half a minute. Turn onto counter top, making piles of about 4 each.

Mix the filling ingredients until blended. Place a heaping tablespoonful of filling in the center of a pancake. Fold one side over filling, then the other, and then fold over the ends.Set aside, folded side down, on a cookie sheet.

Bake in a 350 degree oven for 20 minutes or until nicely browned. Can be served warm or cooled. Serve with sour cream, fruit compote, applesauce, stewed plums, fruit preserves or jam.

BULGARIAN CHEESE ZUCCHINI FRITADA

(4 servings) 1 pound zucchini, grated 8 ounces farmer cheese or feta cheese 2 tablespoons fresh dill 3 eggs, beaten Salt to taste (if using farmer's cheese) 1/4 cup grated parmesan or kaskeval cheese

Set the grated zucchini in a colander for at least 1/2 hour.Squeeze out as much water as possible.

Crumble the farmer's and feta cheese and add to the zucchini. Sprinkle with dill.

Beat the eggs and add to the above, mixing well.

Grease a 9-inch pie plate or small casserole and add the zucchini mixture. Sprinkle with grated cheese.

Bake 45 minutes to an hour in a 350-degree oven, until golden brown.

PINEAPPLE CHEESE NOODLE PUDDING

(8 servings) 8 ounces broad noodles 3 eggs 8 ounces pot cheese 4 tablespoons butter 1 cup sour cream 1/2 cup sugar 1 can (8 ounces) crushed pineapple with juice 1 teaspoon vanilla 1/2 cup white seedless raisins 1 cup milk 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon

Parboil the noodles. Rinse and drain.

Combine eggs, pot cheese, butter and sour cream. Beat well. Add sugar, pineapple with juice and vanilla. Mix well. Add raisins and drained noodles.

Pour mixture into a greased baking dish. Pour milk over all. Refrigerate for several hours. Then sprinkle sugar and cinnamon on top and bake in 350-degree oven for 1 hour.

VERY RICH CREAM CHEESE CAKE 1 1/2 cup sifted flour 6 tablespoons plus 1 3/4 cups sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons grated lemon peel 4 egg yolks and four whole eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 4 packages (8-ounce size) soft cream cheese 1 cup finely grated, very sharp natural cheddar cheese 1/2 teaspoon grated orange peel 1/4 cup beer 1/4 cup heavy cream

In a medium bowl, combine the flour, 6 tablespoons of the sugar and 1 teaspoon of the lemon peel. With a pastry blender cut the batter until crumbly. Then, with a fork, stir in 2 of the egg yolks, and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla to form a dough. Refrigerate 30 minutes.

Press 1/3 of the chilled dough into the bottom of a 9-inch spring-form pan. Bake 8 to 10 minutes in a 400-degree oven until golden brown. Cool. Press rest of dough around sides of pan to within 1 inch of the top.

In a large bowl with the mixer going at high speed, beat the cream cheese until fluffy. Gradually add the cheddar cheese, beating until well blended. It will take about 5 minutes.

Combine the remaining 1 3/4 cup sugar, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon vanilla, remaining 1/2 teaspoon lemon peel and the orange peel. Add gradually to the cheese mixture, beating until smooth. Then add the 4 whole eggs and the 2 remaining egg yolks one at a time, beating well after each addition. Stir in the beer and cream.

Pour the mixture into the spring form. Bake in 500-degree oven 10 to 20 minutes or until the top is light brown. Reduce the heat to 250 degrees and continue baking 2 hours or until the top is firm and a cake tester inserted in the center comes out firm.