The Food Section's fool-proof, computerized system for reproducing recipes has been fooled in two recent editions. Here are the recipes in correct form. The recipe for pate brisse was omitted from the Chocolate Walnut Pastry (June 7) at the end of the story on Ms. Desserts. DEAN KOLSTAD'S CHOCOLATE WALNUT PASTRY (Makes 1) Pate brisse (see recipe below) 1 1/2 cups sugar 1/2 cup water 3 1/2 cups walnuts, plus extra walnut halves for decoration 14 tablespoons milk (1 cup less 2 tablespoons) 14 tablespoons butter (1 3/4 sticks) 1/3 cup honey 6 ounces semisweet chocolate 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter 3/4 teaspoons oil Pate Brisse 3 1/2 cups flour 2 3/4 sticks unsalted butter 1/4 cup sugar 2 eggs Ice water Cut up butter and add to flour and sugar in an electric mixer bowl. Mix until crumbly. Place eggs in a large measuring cup and add enough ice water to make 2 cups. Add to butter, flour and sugar mixture all at once and mix a few seconds until combined. Wrap and chill. Roll chilled dough and fit into a greased, 11-inch tart pan. Reserve extra dough. Chill while preparing the filling. Carmelize sugar by boiling it with water until it dissloves and liquid turns golden brown. At this point it can burn quickly, so as the liquid becomes dark brown, quickly remove pan from heat and add nuts, milk and butter all at once. (Take care, as liquid may splatter). Stir to combine, return to heat and bring to a boil. Allow mixture to simmer for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, then add honey. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Roll out a top crust with remaining dough. Pour cooled filling onto chilled crust. Add top and crimp to make a good seal. Slash a steam slit in the top and bake in a preheated, 400 degree-oven for about 20 minutes, or until top is brown. Refrigerate for about 2 hours. Meanwhile, make the frosting. Melt chocolate over simmering water in the top of a double boiler. Remove from heat and beat in butter and oil. Cover top and sides of the pastry and dec

Someday soon there may be a new country song: the "Ballad of Ms. Desserts." It will be an upbeat number about a sincere, down-to-earth young woman who bakes her way to business success, uplifting the hungry and jaded with the quality of her products while along the way finding inner satisfaction and a recipe for family happiness.

Too good to be true? Only for those who haven't tried one of the carrot cakes made by Ms. Desserts (whose real name is Dean Kolstad) - or her honey walnut cake, or her almond torte with Grand Marnier, or her chocolate marquis cake, or her pecan pie, or her apple or banana cakes, or any of several varieties of quiche she produces, of her bran muffins.

Bran muffins? Of course. They, in a sense, are where it all began for the 33-year-old transplanted Californian with a working husband and two daughters.

In the Christmas season of 1978, Kolstad took a job cooking at Bloomingdale's White Flint store. The store, in her words, "used a lot of bran muffins," serving them with health-food entrees in the restaurant and selling them in the deli. "They were bringing a carrot loaf and a banana loaf from New York and were anxious to find a local supplier. I analyzed them and worked for a month on my own. I came back and they liked mine better. They asked me to keep my job and make muffins, but I thought, why not do it myself and sell to them?"

She began by making 60 dozen muffins in her apartment "with the children tripping over the muffins - they were everywhere." The next day she rented a neighbor's oven, then made a deal with a University of Maryland fraternity to use its kitchen and double oven after 6 p.m. She hired a friend to help. In June, with school out, she could use the kitchen full time.

Another helper was hired and with the increased output, receipts increased from $400 to $1,200 a week. Now, only a year later, Ms. Desserts has 15 employes, a facility in Baltimore capable of making 80 cakes at a time, distribution in New York City as well as locally, and a weekly gross of $7,000.

"I love food, I love to eat, but I know very little about business," Kolstad said on a rare respite from baking and selling. "But I'm getting kind of shrewd." More than 100 stores and restaurants now use her products, and some are available at retail at Bloomingdale's bakeries and delis and the Berliners' stand at the Bethesda Farm Women's Cooperative Market.

With such rapid expansion, "keeping ahead" and quality control become major concerns. No shortcuts, inferior ingredients or preservatives are allowed. "The problem," Kolstad said, "is making sure each cake goes out as if it was the only one produced. That's real hard, but I just don't want to continue if we can't. I want to preserve the joy of making food and of people working together. I see the product as secondary. If you can't enjoy the people and the process, the work equals nothing no matter how successful it is."

If this sounds like a reflection of the post-Sixties values espoused by many young people and projected as a way of life in California, it should. Like a number of others in her home state, Dean Kolstad turned a hobby into a cottage industry. While her husband, Andy, worked toward a graduate degree in sociology at Stanford, Kolstad worked her way through Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking .

"She was my guru," Kolstad says. "She taught me how to love and fondle food. She took nothing for granted. If you had time and a pound of butter and a bottle of wine, you could learn to make anything.

"I never thought of a profession. I was raised to be a momma. But to earn money the last two years in Palo Alto I started selling cakes to restaurants door-to-door. They were very receptive."

Three years ago the Kolstads arrived here. Her husband began work at the Office of Education and she - "knocked out" by the charm of the Farm Women's Market - took a vacant stand. "I was supposed to make fried chicken and doughnuts," Kolstad said. "I made chicken one time: up at 3 a.m., smoke everywhere. It was crazy. So I gave up the chicken, but they let me stay. I made the doughnuts plus crepes, apple cake, carrot cake. But there was too much strain - from the move, from trying to do too much, from guilt because the children were so young [ages 7 and 4 at that time] - so I gave up after three months." The following Christmas, she took the Bloomingdale's job and then went on her own.

She decided to call the business Ms. Desserts "because the women's movement has had a real effect on my consciousness, helping with the feelings of guilt and the identity struggle."

Now, her confidence augmented by a New York magazine tasting that chose hers as the best of that city's carrot cakes, Dean Kolstad wants "to get into yeast" and work with breads. "I'm not really a professional," she explained. "I don't scale ingredients, I just touch and feel my way though. I've never even seen anybody else roll dough. I just know what tastes good."

So far, that has been enough.

Here is one of her recipes, a chocolate walnut pastry creation.

DEAN KOLSTAD'S CHOCOLATE WALNUT PASTRY

(Makes 1) 1 recipe pate brisee (see below) 1 1/2 cups sugar 1/2 cup water 3 1/2 cups walnuts, plus extra walnut halves for decoration 14 tablespoons milk (or 1 cup, less 2 tablespoons) 14 tablespoons butter (1 3/4 sticks) 1/3 cup honey 6 ounces semisweet chocolate 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter 3/4 teaspoon oil

Roll chilled dough and fit into a greased, 11-inch tart pan. Reserve extra dough. Chill while preparing the filling.

Caramelize sugar by boiling it with water until it dissolves and liquid turns golden brown. At this point it can burn quickly, so as the liquid becomes dark brown, quickly remove pan from heat and add nuts, milk and butter all at once. (Take care, as liquid may splatter.) Stir to combine, return to heat and bring to boil. Allow mixture to simmer for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, then add honey. Remove from heat and allow to cool.

Roll out a top crust with remaining dough. Pour cooled filling into chilled crust. Add top and crimp to make a good seal. Slash a steam slit in the top and bake in a preheated, 400-degree oven for about 20 minutes, or until top is brown. Refrigerate for about 2 hours.

Meanwhile, make the frosting. Melt chocolate over simmering water in the top of a double boiler. Remove from heat and beat in butter and oil. Cover top and sides of the pastry and decorate the top with walnut halves.