The time and temperature were left out of the flagship rum buns recipe printed last Sunday. FLAGSHIP RUM BUNS (Makes 18) 1 cup scalded milk 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1/4 cup shortening 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 yeast cake or 1 tablespoon dry yeast 1 egg, beaten 1 1/2 teaspoons rum extract 3 1/2 cups sifted flour 2 tablespoons melted butter 1/4 cup chopped raisins For the icing: 1 cup confectioners' sugar 2 tablespoons hot water 1 teaspoon rum extract Pour scalded milk over 1/4 cup sugar, shortening and salt. Cool to lukewarm and add yeast. Beat until smooth. Add beaten egg and rum extract. Add half the flour and beat until smooth. Add remaining flour and mix until smooth.Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk, about 3 hours. Roll dough in strips, each 12 inches long, 1/2 inch thick and 4 inches wide. Brush top with melted butter and sprinkle with remaining 1/4 cup sugar and raisins. Roll up, pulling dough out at edges to keep it uniform. Should be 15 inches long when rolled. Cut rolls in crosswise slices 3/4 inches thick. Place in 3-inch greased muffin pans, cover and let rise until doubled in bulk. Bake at 400 degrees for about 15 minutes. As soon as rolls are removed from oven, brush with icing. The rolls should be served hot with icing dripping from them. To make icing: combine confectioners' sugar, water and rum extract.

Omni magazine held a contest last summer to find the most unanswerable question. The winning entry, sent in by Dariush Saghafi from University Heights, Ohio: "Why can't you tickle yourself?"

Many questions of the same sort have been posed to The Washington Post's Food section by our readers over the past years. We have done our best to answer them.

Most were serious, of course, like "I just made crepe Suzettes and I thought the recipe said a cup of salt and it was really a teaspoon. How do I fix it?"

Tempting alternative answers spring up, such as: "Throw out the crepe and keep Suzette," but most people are not feeling very jolly after destroying $15 worth of ingredients. The response has to be polite and hopefully helpful.

Other readers have posed more ticklish questions. These usually begin with "Lemme speak to your home economist."

"My freezer went on the blink. Is the food alright?" Some of the once-frozen stuff may be sort of mushy; maybe there're some filets mignon bought on sale last year. You can toss it out, or cook it, or even take a chance and refreeze it, but it is difficult for The Washington Post to award a contamination-free certificate, particularly over the telephone.

The second-most-asked inquiries, further testimony to the importance of the freezer in 1970s America, were the what-can-I-freeze questions. Can I freeze mayonnaise? Raw carrots? Vinegar?

Almost as many want guidance in preparing unusual foods; "What do you do with spaghetti squash?"

There are times when the egg, so to speak, is on our face.

"Your recipe ingredients call for half a pound of sugar, but the directions don't tell me what to do with the sugar."

Of course, sometimes the reader has trouble interpreting the recipe.

"This recipe in your Food section for Phyll's pound cake lists all the ingredients like sugar, flour, butter and eggs, except it says in the instructions to cream the sugar with the butter, but there isn't any cream listed."

Then there are those who believe there is an off-the-cuff answer for a question that some authorities charge large sums of money for answering.

"I'm having 45 people for sit-down dinner tomorrow night. I'm thinking about serving five courses. Will you tell me what to make and what kind of wine to serve with each course and how much food I should buy per person?"

Many people also ask for help in relocating favorite recipes.

"I cut this out of your Food section eight months ago for marshmallow chocolate peanut butter cake. Well, I'm pretty sure it was eight months ago. You do keep all your recipes filed and it's not in there? But it must have been The Post. I read your Food section every Wednesday. You don't come out on Wednesday? Just Thursday and Sunday, are you sure? Oh."

There are numerous written and telephone requests for recipes, some which we printed and some which have appeared in other sections of this newspaper, in other newspapers, magazines or box tops.The standard reply for those that have appeared in the Food section is: Please send us a note naming the recipes and, as close as possible, the date on which it ran. Enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope and we will send you a copy.

Now, without the envelope, we are sending you several of the most requested recipes over the past 10 years. If your have any queries about these recipes, just send us a self-addressed . . .

The following recipe was the most requested, but most often requested by the wrong name. To set the record straight, this is not the YWCA chocolate chip cookie recipe, but Carol Finkelstein's version of it. The YWCA recipe has been kept a secret. CAROL FINKELSTEIN'S CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES (Makes 12) 1 1/3 cups unsifted hardwheat flour or all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons butter 1/4 cup vegetable shortening 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1/4 cup dark brown sugar 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1 large egg 1/2 cup coarsely chopped walnuts 1/4 cup angel-flake coconut 1/4 cup chocolate chips

Mix together flour, soda and salt. Cream together butter, shortening and sugars. Beat in the egg and vanilla. Blend flour into creamed mixture. Mix in walnuts, coconut and chips. Divide dough into 12 equal parts. Flatten each part into a 3 1/2 inch round. Place on greased baking sheet and bake on lowest shelf of oven at 375 degrees for 15 minutes. Even if cookies look underbaked, take them out. AMERICAN CAFE HOUSE DRESSING (Makes about 1 quart) 1/2 cup very finely chopped parsley 1 cup very finely chopped carrots 1/2 cup buttermilk 1 1/2 cups mayonnaise 3/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder 1/4 teaspoon garlic salt 1/4 teaspoon salt

Prepare parsley and carrots. Combine remaining ingredients to make a smooth sauce, then stir in parsely and carrots. If possible, cover and refrigerate overnight before using. This sauce will keep for a week or more, if kept covered and chilled. FLAGSHIP RUM BUNS (Makes 18) 1 cup scalded milk 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1/4 cup shortening 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 yeast cake or 1 tablespoon dry yeast 1 egg, beaten 1 1/2 teaspoons rum extract 3 1/2 cups sifted flour 2 tablespoons melted butter 1/4 cup chopped raisins For the icing: 1 cup confectioners' sugar 2 tablespoons hot water 1 teaspoon rum extract

Pour scalded milk over 1/4 cup sugar, shortening and salt. Cool to lukewarm and add yeast. Beat until smooth. Add beaten egg and rum extract. Add half the flour and beat until smooth. Add remaining flour and mix until smooth. Cover and let rise in a warm place until double in bulk, about 3 hours. Roll dough into two strips, each 12 inches long, 1/2 inch thick and 4 inches wide. Brush top with melted butter and sprinkle with remaining 1/4 cup sugar and raisins. Roll up, pulling dough out at edges to keep it uniform. Should be 15 inches long when rolled.

Cut rolls in crosswise slices 3/4-inch thick. Place in 3-inch greased muffin pans, cover and let rise until doubled minutes.As soon as rolls are removed from oven, brush with icing. The rolls should be served hot with icing dripping from them.

To make icing: Combine confectioners' sugar, water and rum. KEY LIME PIE (6 to 8 servings) 4 eggs 1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice 6 tablespoons granulated sugar 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar One 9-inch graham cracker pie crust, or baked short crust pie shell

Separate eggs, putting yolks into one bowl, three egg whites in one bowl and one egg white in another bowl. Gradually add milk to yolks, stirring as adding. Gradually mix in lime juice. Beat one egg white and fold into mixture. Turn into pie shell. Beat stiffly remaining three egg whites and add sugar and cream of tartar. Pile over filling, spreading to edges. Bake in preheated 350-degree oven for 15 minutes. Cool. Chill. SHAKE IT AND BAKE IT 1 cup flour 2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon pepper 1/2 cup cracker crumbs 1 teaspoon herbs (thyme, oregano, basil or a mixture) Milk or water

Combine dry ingredients, stirring to mix. Use half the mixture for 3 pounds of chicken. Reserve remainder in a tightly covered container.Moisten the chicken with milk or water. Shake chicken pieces with mix a few at a time in a paper bag. Bake in a greased, shallow pan at 350 degrees for 45 minutes to 1 hour. BISCUIT MIX (Makes 13 cups) 9 cups sifted flour 1/3 cup baking powder 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons non-fat milk solids 4 teaspoons salt 1 3/4 cups vegetable shortening

Sift all dry ingredients. Cut shortening into flour until mixture resembles coarse cornmeal. Store, well covered, in a cool dry place. APRICOT CHICKEN (4 to 6 servings) 4-pound fryer, cut-up 1 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon white pepper 1/2 cup flour 1/4 cup melted butter 3/4 cup dark rum 1 large onion, chopped fine 2 pinches of ginger 1/2 cup chicken broth 1 cup dried apricots 1/2 cup water 1 tablespoon brown sugar

Add salt and pepper to flour and roll chicken pieces in it. Melt the butter in a heavy frying pan and brown chicken well on both sides. Pour over 1/2 cup rum and ignite. When flame has burned down, add chopped onions and a pinch of ginger. Cook for 5 minutes, then add chicken broth. Cover the pan and cook over low heat for 40 minutes or until chicken is tender. Meanwhile, cook apricots in 1/2 cup water for 15 minutes, or until barely tender. Add to chicken with 1/4 cup rum, brown sugar and the second pinch of ginger. Mix in well, stirring up brown particles and cook 1 minute longer. Serve chicken and apricots in the sauce.