The flour was left out the Corn and Beef pie recipe that appeared in last Sunday's paper. The recipe is repeated here in its entirety. CORN AND BEEF PIE (6 servings) 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 large onion, finely chopped 1 small green pepper, finely chopped 1 medium tomato, finely chopped or 1 canned tomato, chopped 2 cloves garlic, pressed or minced 1/2 cup diced pimiento-stuffed olives 1/2 cup raisins 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon paprika 3/4 pound ground beef 1/2 cup bulgur Salt to taste Freshly ground black pepper to taste 1 pound package frozen corn 1/4 cup thinly sliced green onion, including green 2 eggs 1 tablespoon flour 1/3 cup milk Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large skillet. Saute onion, pepper, tomato and garlic, until vegetables are softened and liquid from tomato has evaporated. Stir in olives, raisins and spices. Mix in the beef, bulgur, salt and pepper to taste. Spread mixture into bottom and sides of deep 10 inch pie pan or skillet that can go into the oven. Meanwhile heat the remaining tablespoon of oil in skillet. Saute the corn and green onion until onion softens. Spoon mixture into meat pie crust. At this point the dish may be refrigerated until serving time. To serve, allow to sit at room temperature for 20 minutes. Beat together eggs and flour until smooth. Beat in milk. Pour over corn. Bake at 350 degrees 20 to 30 minutes, until eggs are set. Important: allow to cool 10 minutes before serving for best flavor.

HERBS, like recipes, go in and out of fashion. While there may be no such thing as a new herb or a new recipe, for those who haven't tried them they are new enough.

But cumin is hardly new to anyone who knows what goes into Indian curry, who has drunk the famous German liqueur, kummel, or prepared Mexican food. What is new is our use of cumin as a seasoning for foods which don't come from those cultures.We seem to be on the brink of an herbal love affair with cumin. Quite a change from the time 13 years ago when a cookbook author could write: "Not generally used by home cooks, cumin is important in commercial preparations, such as curry powder, chili powder, chutney, sausages, cheeses, meats and pickles."

Cumin, native to Egypt, has been widley used for centuries. The Moors probably carried this pungent, aromatic herb from Africa to Spain. From Spain it made its way to Mexico, where it is called comino, and then across the border. But mostly "in disguise," as just one of several ingredients in chili powder, much as it has always been just one of several ingredients in curry powder. On the other hand, Americans of Northern European descent -- Dutch, Swiss, German, Scandinavian -- have used it in their cooking.

For some strange reason Germans use the same word for cumin and caraway, kummel. While both are members of the parsley family, their flavors are distinctively different. Yet after the Middle Ages, when cumin was still very popular, caraway began to replace it. No one seems to know why.

The interest in cumin as a distinct entity has been gradual. In the last decade Americans move beyond French, Italian and Chinese as the only foreign cooking they would try. Indian curry is no longer just Indian curry. fWe have learned that curries vary greatly according to region and that they come in all strengths, the proportions of the spices changing according to the cook.

Our interest in Mexican food now extends beyond tacos and burritos. We know there is a difference between chili powder and chiles.

Most recently North African food has been engaging our attention, or at least the attention of those who put out the food magazines, of which there are now five. (Ten years ago there was only one food magazine.) Within the space of a few months three of those magazines ran pieces on Moroccan food and all of them had some variation of the olive-orange-onion salad which is flavored with cumin.

Considering its exceptional flavor and the ancients' belief that it stimulates the appetite, it's surprising we are so late in coming to cumin. Combine its delicious properties with the Middle Ages belief that cumin keeps lovers from becoming fickle and chicken from straying from home (has that been aproblem lately?), and the herb should be outselling basil in no time.

Use cumin in rice, sauerkraut, pastries, sprinkle it on salads and over chicken. And if you want your guests to be hungry, add it to the hors d'oeuvres you serve before dinner.

If you don't know where to begin, you might start with these recipes: CORN AND BEEF PIE

A dish whose origins are South American, some of the group beef in this recipe has been replaced by less fattening bulgur (not very South American), but complementary just the same. (6 servings) 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 large onion, finely chopped 1 small green pepper, finely chopped 1 medium tomato, finely chopped or 1 canned tomato, chopped 2 cloves garlic, pressed or minced 1/2 cup diced pimiento-stuffed olives 1/2 cup raisins 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon paprika 3/4 pound ground beef 1/2 cup bulgur Salt to taste Freshly ground black pepper to taste 1 pound package frozen corn 1/4 cup thinly sliced green onion, including green 2 eggs 1/3 cup milk

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large skillet. Saute onion, pepper, tomato and garlic, until vegetables are softened and liquid from tomato has evaporated. Stir in olives, raisins and spices. Mix in the beef, bulgur, salt and pepper to taste. Spread mixture into bottom and sides of deep 10 inch pie pan or skillet that can go into the oven.

Meanwhile heat the remaining tablespoon of oil in skillet. Saute the corn and green onion until onion softens. Spoon mixture into meat pie crust.

At this point the dish may be refrigerated until serving time. To serve, allow to sit at room temperature for 20 minutes. Beat together eggs and flour until smooth. Beat in milk. Pour over corn. Bake at 350 degrees 20 to 30 mintues, until eggs are set. Important: allow to cool 10 minutes before serving for best flavor. CARROTS, GINGER AND CUMIN (4 to 6 servings) 1 pound carrots 1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger 2 cloves garlic, chopped 2 teaspoons cumin seed* 2 tablespoons lemon juice 6 tablespoons butter 1/2 cup low fat or regular milk

*McCormick whole cumin seeds are available at Giant. Cumin powder is available where Indian and South American spices are sold.

Scrape the carrots and cut into medium slices or slice in food processor. Cook carrots in boiling salted water until just tender, about 5 minutes, depending on thickness of carrots. Drain and rinse under cold water to stop cooking.

Meanwhile saute the cumin in 1 tablespoon butter for about 30 seconds. Add the ginger and garlic and saute 1 minute longer. Combine the cooked drained carrots with the cumin-garlic mixture, the lemon juice, remaining butter and milk, and process in food processor with steel blade, in batches, until smooth. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper.To serve, heat through. CUCUMBERS IN YOGURT 1 1/2 pints plain yogurt 1/2 of small onion, finely minced 1 small cucumber, finely chopped 1/2 teaspoon cumin Few dashes hot red pepper 1/2 teaspoon cilantro (Chinese parsley) (available in Oriental markets) Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Combine ingredients; chill for an hour or longer. Serve as dip with toasted pita wedges, or as side dish with plain broiled chicken. CUMIN BALLS (Makes about 16) 1 egg 1/4 pound unsalted butter, softened 2 teaspoons ground cumin seed 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup low fat milk 2 cups whole wheat flour 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup grated white Cheddar cheese 1 teaspoon caraway seeds

Cream butter, add egg and beat well. Add the cumin, caraway, cheese and salt. Combine the flour and baking powder and stir in, alternately with milk. Start and end with flour mixture. Knead about 2 minutes, until smooth. Grease baking sheet. Form balls about the size of an egg and place on baking sheet. Bake at 425 degrees for about 15 minutes, until bottoms begin to brown. Serve warm butter if desired. ORANGE, ONION AND OLIVE SALAD (8 servings) 8 large navel oranges, peeled, white membrane removed, thinly sliced 2 medium red onions, thinly sliced and then separated into rings 40 oil-cured black olives 1/2 cup good quality olive oil 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin 4 teaspoons lemon juice or lime juice Freshly ground black pepper

Arrange the orange slices in an overlapping circle on 8 individual salad plates. Top with onion rings and olives, 5 per plate. Beat oil with cumin and lime or lemon juice and drizzle over salads. Sprinkle with freshly ground pepper. Chill until serving time, covered.