COFFEE CAKES aren't made from coffee, so it's a surprise to find that some tea breads actually have tea as an ingredient. But when you stop to think about it, there's such a wide range of teas, many with delicate flavorings, that tea in a tea loaf can create a subtle, haunting addition. Although the includsion of tea makes the breads unusual, they remain true to the tea bread tradition by being made without yeast and by being studded with fruits and/or nuts.

Here then are two such tea-breads-made-with-tea. As with any other tea breads, they are equally delicious served at tea, breakfast, a light lunch or just for snacking. JASMINE TEA BREAD 3/4 cup sugar 1/2 stick butter, softened 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 tablespoon grated orange rind 1 teaspoon grated lemon rind 1 teaspoon grated lime rind 3 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 3/4 cup orange juice 1/2 cup jasmine tea 1/2 cup chopped pecans

In a large bowl combine the sugar and butter until the mixture is light. Then add the egg and fruit rinds. Into another bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon. Add the flour mixture to the butter and sugar mixture a bit at a time, and alternating with the addition of the orange juice combined with the jasmine tea. Beat well after each addition. Add the pecans and combine the batter well. Turn the batter into a well greased loaf pan and let the batter stand for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake the loaf for 45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let the bread cool in the pan for 10 minutes and then turn it out on a wire rack to cool completely. BRACH

A friend brought back this old Welsh recipe after visiting a cousin in Wales. The bread, pronounced "brock," is not particularly sweet, falling into the category of the stolid, sensible tea loaf. 1/2 pound raisins 1/2 pound currants 1 cup of cold tea 2 cups flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 egg, well beaten 1/4 cup brown sugar

Combine the currants, raisins, enough of the cup of cold tea to cover and soak overnight. (Do not use only raisins, as the currants are important to the texture of the finished loaf.) The next morning, preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Then combine the raisins, currantes, and any tea remaining from the cup with the flour, baking powder, egg, and brown sugar. It will make a stiff batter. Turn the batter into a well greased loaf pan and bake for 2 hours, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let the bread cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then turn out on a wire rack to cool completely.