The chief of the Raven Beaver tribe flew in with some of his and Jimmy Carter's "kinfolk," former logger Malcolm Doiron flew in with a slice of a 203-year-old tree, fisherman Eric Jordan flew in with four 30-pound salmons and John Denver, well, he of course flew in with his guitar.

They and about 800 others all added up to one of the biggest pep rallies seen in months on Capitol Hill, where the controversial Alaska lands bill that has pitted environmentalists against developers comes up for a vote in the Senate this week.

"If you think your efforts are for naught, forget it," Secretary of the Interior Cecil Andrus told the mob jammed into a Dirksen Office Building reception last night at the joint invitation of Americans for Alaska and Denver's Windstar Productions.

For weeks a coalition of conservation-minded volunteers has been staffing a phone bank and buttonholing senators in a lobbying effort to pass legislation that will affect the disposition of more than 100 million acres of federal lands in Alaska. President Carter, who received an Alaskan contingent yesterday morning at the White House, is on the record as calling the matter "the top environmental priority of my administration and perhaps of my entire life."

Last night Andrus said the next three days were critical -- starting today when a Tsongas-Roth wildlife refuge amendment comes up for a vote. This amendment, along with several proposed, would strengthen the environmentalists' hand and bring the bill closer to that passed by the House last year. As it now stands, environmentalists feel the Senate bill would severely reduce the amount of land under federal protection.

"This is the last chance that we have to do it right the first time," said Andrus. "There isn't a person in this room who hasn't been involved in a salvage operation at one time, in saving a river or saving the redwoods. In Alaska there is no opportunity to do it again."

Which is why Chief Fred and other Tlingit Indians made the trip from Admiralty Island. "I think we've made some friends among the senators, showed them we're true Alaskans and not some paid stooges like those guys working for big timber and mining companies."

When the chief spotted Rep. John Seiberling (D-Ohio), who played a key role with Reps. Morris Udall (D-Ariz.) and John Anderson (R-Ill.) in the fight to pass legislation in the House last year, it turned into a family reunion. In 1977 Seiberling was made an honorary chief in the Raven-Beaver tribe and with it went the name of an early tribal chief, L'angooshoo. Yesterday, L'angooshoo's granddaughter was among the Indian contingent.

"I've got to meet my granddaughter," Seiberling said when he heard about Jean Hogue, following up the introduction with a fatherly embrace.

Ex-logger Malcolm Doiron of Ketchikan, another genuine Alaskan eager to prove his existence to senators holding "swing votes," carried a round of western hemlock measuring 12 inches in diameter as evidence that growing a tree that size can take a couple hundred years.

"The forest service tells us it takes longer to grow a tree than they used to think it did," said Doiron."Then along comes this bill (S-9) which would allow the timber industry to cut down 520 million board feet a year, more even than the 441 million they've been averaging."

Eric Jordan of Southeastern Alaskan Fisheries brought the salmon as part of the evening's refreshment, another example of Alaska's natural resources.

And John Denver, who went to the White House yesterday and afterward lobbied Sens. John Glenn (D-Ohio) and John Warner (R-Va.): "Glenn had some 'reservations, but I made a few points. Warner seemed very open."

(To wind up his campaign, Denver strummed and sang "My heart turns to Alaska . . ." without benefit of a microphone. "I don't need a mike," he told the mob, "when I go into the wilderness I take a raft on my back and paddle out to the middle of a lake where I serenade the moon and the stars. I don't have a mike then." The crowd loved it.)

Warner, one of the swing votes eyed by the environmentalists, maintained that he is "absolutely neutral" and he called Denver's lobbying efforts the "most persuasive bit of informative discussion I've received in the last 90 days."

Where it all would lead, Warner couldn't say. "But I'm very anxious to have a piece of legislation on this issue. It's been going on too long. The Senate has a responsibility."