Ed Fouchy . . . the CBS News bureau chief here since August, 1978 . . . yesterday was promoted to vice president, director of news for the network in New York . . . the top operating job on the "hard news" side of No. 1-rated CBS News. . .

Fouchy, who first joined CBS in 1966 as an associate producer for the CBS Evening News, thus becomes a top candidate to succeed CBS News President William A. Leonard when the latter retires in June of next year. . .

He replaces Burton (Bud) Benjamin . . . whose valuable services the network didn't want to lose as retirement age nears . . . and is thus being moved to the job of senior executive proucer, hard news broadcasts . . . from which spot he'll also produce Walter Cronkite's specials after the latter quits the Evening News anchor job in March. . .

Fouchy takes over on the first of April. . .

Jack Smith . . . described by one source as a "non-nonsense, straightforward newsman" . . . will replace Fouchy as vice president and bureau chief in Washington. . .

Smith has been CBS Bureau chief in Chicago and has had key roles in election and convention coverage for the network in the last two national elections. . .

Also moving up in the CBS News hierarchy yesterday was Roger Colloff . . . currently vice president and assistant to Leonard. . .

Colloff replaces Robert Chandler as vice president and director, public affairs broadcasts . . . that is, he takes over as head of the "soft news" area. . .

Chandler becomes senior vice president, administration, with responsibilities for planning, public information, policy administration, research and resources development . . . becoming in effect Leonard's senior deputy and the man in charge when Leonard isn't around the shop . . . although he moves from the editorial side of the business. . .

Colloff . . . who was a legislative assistant to then-Sen. Walter Mondale in the early 1970s and an assistant to energy secretary James Schlesinger . . . also served for about a year with CBS, Inc. here when Leonard ran the corporate office several years ago. . . He rejoined CBS News and Leonard in New York in 1979. . .

Except for Fouchy's move, the job switches are due to take place in about two weeks. . .

Fouchy . . . who has also been in Saigon and Los Angeles for CBS . . . has always been highly thought of at the network and the story in Washington has been that when career opportunities seemed slim and he jumpted to NBC News here for several years . . . top executives at CBS kept a slot open for him at the Bureau here, confident he'd find his way back . . . which he did in 1977. . .

Fouchy now joins CBS Sports president Van Gordon Sauter and Ed Joyce . . . currently vice president and general manager of CBS-owned KNXT-TV in Los Angeles on what is considered the fast track at CBS News in the run to succeed Leonard . . . with Colloff abviously moving up on an outside lane. . . Moving Right Along

Although no announcement was made yesterday . . . the top management changes also mean that Sanford Socolow (another former CBS Washington Bureau chief) will remain as executive producer of CBS Evening News in New York when Dan Rather replaces Cronkite. . .

NBC announced yesterday it's killing "Sanford" (60th last week) as of tonight's episode. . .

It'll be replaced at 8:30 Fridays by the "The Brady Brides" . . . which picks up the story of the Brady Bunch many years down the track starting Feb. 6. . .

NBC has decided to keep "Hill Street Blues" in its current 10 p.m. Saturday slot for the eight remaining weeks of its current run. . .

Probably the best new series the network has introduced in several years . . . it's been bounced around the schedule during its first five outings and last week . . . in two appearances . . . managed only a 19 share on Thursday night and a 25 share on Saturday, finishing 64th and 57th, respectively, in the weekly ratings. . .

Two native Washingtonians . . . Veronica Redd and Kenny Long . . . have roles in tomorrow night's episode of "WKRP in Cincinnati" on Channel 9. . .

And Big Doins at CBS Sports yesterday . . . where Terry O'Neil has been hired away from ABC Sports to be executive in charge of production of CBS' weekend sports anthology programming . . . previously known as Sports Spectacular. . .

Terry replaces executive producer who had been due to move into a top job for ABC Monday Night Football when . . . on the eve of the Dallas-Redskin season lid-lifter . . . he ran afoul of the Terrible-Tempered Howard Cosell. . . .

CBS Sports, by the way,is mourning the death of Bill Brendle . . . associate director of press information there. . .

Brendle practically pioneered TV sports public relations . . . starting back in 1953 with ABC . . . when that very young network was lucky to carry a half-hour of sports films a week. . .

He'd been at CBS Sports for 17 years. Wait There's More

ABC News three-hour Wednesday night rerun of its "America Held Hostage: The Secret Negotiations" documentary averaged only a 20 percent audience share in the top three markets . . . as NBC easily carried the night from 8 to 11 in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles (37 average) . . . with CBS (22) running second. . .

Channel 32 . . . Howard University's new TV station . . . have a new, $30,000 satellite receiving dish sitting out on the campus football field awaiting installation . . . thanks to a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. . .

It's arrival means that the eight-hour daily programming schedule planned by WHMM could be on the air sometime in March . . . since the dish will be able to pick up, PBS shows off Westar. . . And Finally

They're giving a farewell party for retiring FCC Commissioner Tyrone Brown today at the agency. . .

Brown, you'll remember, earlier this month chose to resign with five of the seven years of his term on the FCC still to go, with the advent of the Reagan administration . . . and will join the top law firm of Steptoe and Johnson here next week. . .

Before Brown left, however, the only black commissioner had some cautionary words for the National Religious Broadcasters, who met here earlier this week, in his last major address as an FCC member. . .

"The profound religious revival underway in this country," Brown said, "is in some quarters sometimes identified with the political movement that describes itself as the Moral Majority . . . the two, I believes, are not the same.

"In the spiritual movement, I sense a grass-roots effort to return to traditional spiritual values to sustain us as individuals and as a nation, as we transit the technological revolution of our time.

"Certainly that also is a goal of the political Moral Majority. But on the border of the latter movement, I also sense a theme that I find ver distrubing -- a theme that counsels retreat from our national commitment to equal opportunity, retreat from the goal of raising the living standards of the poorest among us, who all too often are minorities, and retreat from the religious principle that all of us are brothers and equal in the sight of God.

"The theme," Brown continued, "that appears to run through some of the polemics of the Moral Majority that disturbs me is the provincial notion that people are to be divided into 'them' and 'us,' with minority Americans falling into the 'them' category.

"I fear that unless this theme in the catechism of the Moral Majority is eliminated, that force will become another code word for racism in our society. . ."

Brown warned the religious broadcasters against permitting the "broad movement for religious revival to become too closely identified with any political movement" and urged them in their "missionary work, in [their] role as spiritual leaders, [to] remind your followers regularly, that the 'them/us' attitude is narrow and unloving". . . Programming Hostages in New York

The ticker-tape parade for the returned American hostages will be aired on Channel 4 (NBC) live from noon until 12:30 p.m. with Tom Brokaw and George Lewis. Children's Fare

"It's Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown." (R) The little redheaded girl is the queen and Charlie is chosen to kick the football at the big homecoming game (Channel 9 at 8).

"The Popeye Valentine Special: Sweethearts At Sea." Olive Oyl signs up for a cruise with Bluto after Popeye forgets Valentine's Day (Channel 9 at 8:30). Abortion Special

"So Many Voices: A Look At Abortion in America." This syndicated program has been nominated for an Emmy in New York and is sponsored by the National Abortion Rights Action League. Hosted by Ed Asner and Tammy Grimes, much of it was filmed in Ft. Wayne, Ind. Although it is obviously pro-abortion, it is considered a well-balanced examination of the problems confronted by women who must consider abortion. Another in Channel 7's beefed-up issues programming, this particular half-hour is part of the station's equal-time response to the controversial anti-abortion film shown last month (Channel 7 at 8:30). Public Broadcasting

"Evening Exchange." Scheduled guest is Deborah Marshall, a member of the Prince George's County Council (Channel 32 at 7).

"Washington Week in Review" (Channel 26 at 8).

"Wall Street Week." Buy! (Channel 26 at 8:30).

"Hard Choices." A report on the growing confusion about patients' rights and medical ethics, particularly focusing on the issue of prolonging life (Channel 26 at 9).

"Metro Week in Review." Weiser of The Post on accused murderer Bernard Welch; Robinson of The Post on the happy hostage return; and Myer of The Star on suicides in the Arlington jail (Channel 26 at 10). Prime-Time Movie

"The Nanny" (1965). Nursemaid Bette Davis is accused by her psychotic 10-year-old ward of trying to kill him. With William Dix and Wendy Craig (Channel 20 at 8). Series

"Harper Valley P.T.A." Stella (a.k.a. Barbara Eden) climbs into Barbara's old I-Dream-of-Jeannie-harem garb to foil a plot by Flora, who has found a copy of Sleaze magazine in Stella's mailbox. The costume change, exposing Barbara's bellybutton, is also expected to boost ratings (Channel 4 at 8).

"Nero Wolfe." Nero is the executor of a mobster's huge estate which is due to go to the mobster's daughter. First the mobster hires a decoy for his daughter and she's killed. Then the mobster is killed. But Tubs will figure it all out (Channel 4 at 9).

"NBC Magazine with David Brinkley" is previewed by Tom Shales on page B4. (Channel 4 at 10).

"Dallas." A new character is introduced when J. R. hires a beautiful p.r. woman to help his image, even as Miss Ellie simmers over Jock's role in recent family troubles and it looks like Pam is fooling around (Channel 9 at 10). Late Night

"The Tonight Show." With David Letterman, Lily Tomlin, Paul Raley and Warren Eckstein (Channel 4 at 11:30).

"The Midnight Special." A revised format with more laughs, at least in theory. With Andy Kaufman, Freddie Cannon, Slim Whitman, Queen, and the Motels. You know, TV Column fans, some night they'll get The Cars and the Motels together on the same program. "You go first," the Cars will probably say. "No, you go first," the Motels will reply. "We'd be nothing without you." And then again, they may not put the Cars and the Motels on the same program (Channel 4 at 12:30).