Last night in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, pianist Raymond Jackson repeated part of the program he had played Sunday night at the National Gallery, offering a rare opportunity for precise comparison of the two auditoriums. It may be no surprise at all that the Kennedy Center sounds better, but it is good to see a theory so closely confirmed by fact, and the performance was well worth hearing twice.

The chief difference was in enhanced clarity and it was particularly beneficial to Bach's Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue in D minor, which received a beautifully shaped and nuanced interpretation, brilliant in its counterpoint and splendidly songlike in lyric passages. The Liszt Ballade in B minor was played with enormous power and a splendid sense of its form, and the effect was enhanced by superior acoustics--though there is something to be said for the reverberation of the East Garden Court, which sometimes makes loud bass notes hang in the air like a curtain of sound.

To open the program, saxophonist Reginald Jackson demonstrated the quality of both the soprano and alto sax and the poverty of their repertoire, playing pleasant, melodious music of no special distinction with a warmth and subtlety of tone, a fluidity of phrasing, an agility and grace that should inspire composers to write better music for these fine instruments.

The program, billed as "Washingtonians in Concert for Wolf Trap," might have done better if it had ended at around this point, fulfilling the performing arts axiom that you should leave the audience wanting more. But more was provided on this occasion: expert performances of Brahms and Debussy by clarinetist William Blayney and a program of piano music and songs by pianist-composer Harvey Jacobson with soprano Linda Lafferty. Lafferty's voice is good but could use more training; Jacobson's songs have an easy melodic charm but little originality, emotional depth or aptness of music to words. A few of them might be pleasant enough for contrast in a program of other songs, but neither the music nor the performance seemed to justify stretching out a concert until 11:15.

The audience was disappointingly small--probably not large enough to cover expenses, let alone help rebuild the Filene Center. Raymond Jackson -In -----Concert -For -----Wolf Trap By Joseph McLellan

Last night in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, pianist Raymond Jackson repeated part of the program he had played Sunday night at the National Gallery, offering a rare opportunity for precise comparison of the two auditoriums. It may be no surprise at all that the Kennedy Center sounds better, but it is good to see a theory so closely confirmed by fact, and the performance was well worth hearing twice.

The chief difference was in enhanced clarity and it was particularly beneficial to Bach's Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue in D minor, which received a beautifully shaped and nuanced interpretation, brilliant in its counterpoint and splendidly songlike in lyric passages. The Liszt Ballade in B minor was played with enormous power and a splendid sense of its form, and the effect was enhanced by superior acoustics--though there is something to be said for the reverberation of the East Garden Court, which sometimes makes loud bass notes hang in the air like a curtain of sound.

To open the program, saxophonist Reginald Jackson demonstrated the quality of both the soprano and alto sax and the poverty of their repertoire, playing pleasant, melodious music of no special distinction with a warmth and subtlety of tone, a fluidity of phrasing, an agility and grace that should inspire composers to write better music for these fine instruments.

The program, billed as "Washingtonians in Concert for Wolf Trap," might have done better if it had ended at around this point, fulfilling the performing arts axiom that you should leave the audience wanting more. But more was provided on this occasion: expert performances of Brahms and Debussy by clarinetist William Blayney and a program of piano music and songs by pianist-composer Harvey Jacobson with soprano Linda Lafferty. Lafferty's voice is good but could use more training; Jacobson's songs have an easy melodic charm but little originality, emotional depth or aptness of music to words. A few of them might be pleasant enough for contrast in a program of other songs, but neither the music nor the performance seemed to justify stretching out a concert until 11:15.

The audience was disappointingly small--probably not large enough to cover expenses, let alone help rebuild the Filene Center.