Breaking a longstanding tradition of not naming his films until they're finished, Woody Allen has dubbed his next outing "Broadway Danny Rose"; it's currently shooting in New York and stars, naturally, Mia Farrow . . . in keeping with his longstanding tradition of producing loud, sloppy comedies ("Animal House," "Meatballs") Ivan Reitman is starting production on "Adventures in the Creep Zone," a project now filming in Canada that has been described as " 'Road Warrior' in outer space" . . . John Schlesinger was signed to direct the film version of Martin Cruz Smith's Moscow-based thriller "Gorky Park" last April, but earlier this month Schlesinger withdrew from the project. The film -- with a screenplay written by "Pennies From Heaven" writer Dennis Potter -- is now in the hands of Michael Apted, whose previous movies include the whodunit "Agatha" and the rock musical "Stardust" . . . A three-part television series Ingmar Bergman directed for European television may end up on American movie screens next year; the director is currently recutting "Fanny and Alexander" to feature film length, and Embassy Communications has picked up an option on the project . . . Clint Eastwood is getting into videocassettes with a vengeance this month: Nine of his movies are suddenly for sale in that format, eight of them previously rental-only items and one, "Firefox," making its first appearance as a cassette . . . and Douglas Trumbull may finally receive the money he needs to finish "Brainstorm," the movie sidelined by Natalie Wood's death. Word is that MGM's Freddie Fields is arranging to get Trumbull the $3.5 million he needs to wrap things up. include the whodunit "Agatha" and the rock musical "Stardust" . . . A three-part television series Ingmar Bergman directed for European television may end up on American movie screens next year; the director is currently recutting "Fanny and Alexander" to feature film length, and Embassy Communications has picked up an option on the project . . . Clint Eastwood is getting into videocassettes with a vengeance this month: Nine of his movies are suddenly for sale in that format, eight of them previously rental-only items and one, "Firefox," making its first appearance as a cassette . . . and Douglas Trumbull may finally receive the money he needs to finish "Brainstorm," the movie sidelined by Natalie Wood's death. Word is that MGM's Freddie Fields is arranging to get Trumbull the $3.5 million he needs to wrap things up.