Pope John Paul II has summoned the cardinals of the church worldwide to an extraordinary meeting in Rome next month.

While there has been no official Vatican announcement of the event, the main purpose of the gathering is believed to be consideration of Vatican financial problems, including the involvement of the Vatican Bank in the affairs of Italian financier Roberto Calvi, who was found hanged in London after the failure of his Banco Ambrosiano.

The pope has announced plans to visit Spain Oct. 31 to Nov. 9, a trip that was first delayed by the assassination attempt on the pontiff and then by the Spanish election campaign.

In his 16th trip outside Italy since his election in 1978, the pope will visit 17 Spanish cities and towns in 10 days. He will give about 50 addresses, say 10 masses, and preside at about 10 other liturgical celebrations.

The trip will begin three days after the Spanish elections.

The governor of New Jersey has 45 days to decide whether to sign into law a measure requiring public school teachers to start each day's classes with a minute of silence.

Lawyers for Gov. Thomas H. Kean will review the constitutionality of the proposal, sent to him this week after a 30-to-5 vote in the state Senate. Kean, a Republican, has not indicated whether he will sign the measure.

In 1978 and 1981, Gov. Brendan T. Byrne vetoed similiar proposals he said were unnecessary and probably unconstitutional.

Legislative supporters say the minute of silence would give children the opportunity to pray in the classroom without violating the U.S. Constitution's prohibition against mixing church and state.

The bill drew heated opposition from a handful of senators who said it was not only unconstitutional but also would make an extra demand on teachers that would not necessarily help students.

North Carolina Lutherans and Episcopalians got the jump on extending ecumenical relations between their two traditions when an Episcopal bishop joined in distributing holy communion at the installation of a Lutheran bishop.

Episcopal Bishop William G. Weinhauer had been invited as one of six ecumenical representatives at the installation of Dr. Michael C.D. McDaniel as Lutheran Church in America bishop in North Carolina. While Lutheran dignitaries were robing for the service, someone suggested that Weinhauer be invited to join in administering holy communion.

"I'd be honored," Weinhauer said, and Episcopal and Lutheran clergy stood side by side in the rite.

Lutheran and Episcopal national bodies voted last month to recognize each other's communion services.

Religious Heritage of America has given its 1982 Gold Medal, awarded annually to a clergyman with more than 50 years in the ministry, to the Rev. Dr. Clarence W. Cranford, minister emeritus of Calvary Baptist Church here. President Reagan received the group's Religious Heritage Award.

The group's Great Living American awards went to Chicago insurance magnate W. Clement Stone and to Jay Van Andel, board chairman of Amway Corp.

The Rev. Edward K. Braxton, who has served as personal theologian to Roman Catholic Archbishop James A. Hickey here, has been recalled to his home diocese of Chicago by Archbishop Joseph L. Bernardin. Braxton, who is expected to be named a bishop at some future date, has been temporarily assigned to Chicago's Holy Name Cathedral until January, when he will go to Rome for six months as scholar in residence at the North American College there. Pope Calls All Cardinals To Conclave at Vatican World of Religion

Pope John Paul II has summoned the cardinals of the church worldwide to an extraordinary meeting in Rome next month.

While there has been no official Vatican announcement of the event, the main purpose of the gathering is believed to be consideration of Vatican financial problems, including the involvement of the Vatican Bank in the affairs of Italian financier Roberto Calvi, who was found hanged in London after the failure of his Banco Ambrosiano.

The pope has announced plans to visit Spain Oct. 31 to Nov. 9, a trip that was first delayed by the assassination attempt on the pontiff and then by the Spanish election campaign.

In his 16th trip outside Italy since his election in 1978, the pope will visit 17 Spanish cities and towns in 10 days. He will give about 50 addresses, say 10 masses, and preside at about 10 other liturgical celebrations.

The trip will begin three days after the Spanish elections.

The governor of New Jersey has 45 days to decide whether to sign into law a measure requiring public school teachers to start each day's classes with a minute of silence.

Lawyers for Gov. Thomas H. Kean will review the constitutionality of the proposal, sent to him this week after a 30-to-5 vote in the state Senate. Kean, a Republican, has not indicated whether he will sign the measure.

In 1978 and 1981, Gov. Brendan T. Byrne vetoed similiar proposals he said were unnecessary and probably unconstitutional.

Legislative supporters say the minute of silence would give children the opportunity to pray in the classroom without violating the U.S. Constitution's prohibition against mixing church and state.

The bill drew heated opposition from a handful of senators who said it was not only unconstitutional but also would make an extra demand on teachers that would not necessarily help students.

North Carolina Lutherans and Episcopalians got the jump on extending ecumenical relations between their two traditions when an Episcopal bishop joined in distributing holy communion at the installation of a Lutheran bishop.

Episcopal Bishop William G. Weinhauer had been invited as one of six ecumenical representatives at the installation of Dr. Michael C.D. McDaniel as Lutheran Church in America bishop in North Carolina. While Lutheran dignitaries were robing for the service, someone suggested that Weinhauer be invited to join in administering holy communion.

"I'd be honored," Weinhauer said, and Episcopal and Lutheran clergy stood side by side in the rite.

Lutheran and Episcopal national bodies voted last month to recognize each other's communion services.

Religious Heritage of America has given its 1982 Gold Medal, awarded annually to a clergyman with more than 50 years in the ministry, to the Rev. Dr. Clarence W. Cranford, minister emeritus of Calvary Baptist Church here. President Reagan received the group's Religious Heritage Award.

The group's Great Living American awards went to Chicago insurance magnate W. Clement Stone and to Jay Van Andel, board chairman of Amway Corp.

The Rev. Edward K. Braxton, who has served as personal theologian to Roman Catholic Archbishop James A. Hickey here, has been recalled to his home diocese of Chicago by Archbishop Joseph L. Bernardin. Braxton, who is expected to be named a bishop at some future date, has been temporarily assigned to Chicago's Holy Name Cathedral until January, when he will go to Rome for six months as scholar in residence at the North American College there.