Now Here's the News Tom Wopat and John Schneider have dropped their lawsuit against Warner Bros., and will return next month to "The Dukes of Hazzard," the studio announced yesterday. . . Just 10 days ago a Warner Bros. spokesman issued a "categorical denial" of reports in The Washington Post that Schneider would return. . . At a Dec. 12 taping of "Christmas in Washington," which included Schneider performing, Schneider told Post reporter Jacqueline Trescott he had signed a contract with Warner Bros. and expected to return to the show Jan. 3. . . Warner Bros. made a concerted effort to knock down the story . . . calling Captain Airwaves two days in a row to issue denials "from the very highest levels of the Warner Bros. legal department" that any agreement had been reached or that any serious talks were under way. . . CBS also denied the reports. . . Wopat and Schneider quit the show last May and filed a $25 million suit against the studio. They charged they had been cheated out of millions of dollars in merchandizing related to the show. Warner Bros. countersued for $92 million, alleging libel and breach of contract, then hired Brian Cherry and Christopher Mayer to fill Wopat and Schneider's shoes on what was then the seventh highest rated show. Last week the show, on CBS, was No. 33. . . Cherry and Mayer are expected to stay with the series. . . Warner Bros. Television also announced yesterday it had dropped its suit. . . No announcement yet on when the first "Dukes" segment starring Wopat and Schneider will appear. . . Congress passed a joint resolution authorizing President Reagan to proclaim December as "National Closed-Captioning Television Month" . . . on Dec. 20 . . . On a recent visit to Antarctica to shoot a segment for "20/20" . . . Hugh Downs moved the pole marking the South Pole 30 feet . . . President Reagan called Sam Donaldson yesterday to congratulate the ABC White House correspondent on his engagement to Kansas City TV reporter Jan Smith . . . Sam's on vacation out in (where else?) Kansas City, so the White House switchboard, which never fails, did have a little trouble catching up with him . . . Holy Kawasaki! Thomas Reilly . . . who plays Officer Bobby "Hot Dog" Nelson on NBC's "CHiPs" . . . was arrested in downtown Los Angeles late Tuesday night by motorcycle officers on suspicion of driving under the influence, possession of a Quaalude tranquilizer and driving without a California driver's license. . . Two policemen said they saw Hot Dog's 1979 Cadillac Seville being driven "erratically at a high speed" when they pulled him over . . . He was released after spending about three hours in jail . . . Police said Reilly, 23, was carrying a New York driver's license, an actors Equity Card and a Screen Actors Guild membership card . . . Police found a methaqualone pill on him during booking, according to Sgt. Richard Studdard . . . NBC declined to comment on his arrest, but a spokesman for MGM-UA Television, which produces "CHiPs," said Reilly was at work on location yesterday and his arrest would not affect the series . . . Hot Dog is scheduled to be arraigned Jan. 6 . . . "Entertainment Tonight" is now seen on 129 stations . . . ESPN, the 24-hour sports cable network, is launching an ESPN fashion line . . . that will include jogging suits, gym shorts, bats and balls. . . The Simmons Research Bureau estimates that viewers in 12.2 percent of ESPN's households make more than $30,000 and 20.8 percent have professional or technical jobs. . . (Do you get the feeling, TV Column fans, that this pre-holiday TV Column is going absolutely nowhere this morning?) . . . Limping Right Along Ralph Edwards is bringing back 130 half-hour episodes of the old "This Is Your Life" and will combine them with 39 new versions for syndication starting next September . . . Two of the old-timers feature President Reagan . . . One 1950 episode toasts actor Reagan and he substitutes for Edwards as host in another . . . Edwards doesn't know if those two will be included in the new syndication package . . . Some of those who will be: Gen. Mark Clark, Nat Cole, Norman Vincent Peale, Lowell Thomas, Dinah Shore, Casey Stengel, Billy Graham and Minnie Pearl . . . CBS is producing "Arthur the King," which will star Malcolm McDowell, Dyan Cannon and Candice Bergen . . . Mobil Corp. has accused CBS of "actions to dissuade" network affiliates from broadcasting the nine-hour, four-night "The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby," which Mobil is syndicating and sponsoring, starting Jan. 10 . . . Mobil has lined up 62 stations, including six CBS affiliates, to air the mini-series . . . (it will be seen on independent Channel 5 here) . . . Herbert Schmertz, Mobil's vice president for public affairs, complained in a telegram to Gene Jankowski, president of CBS/Broadcast Group . . . Schmertz told the Associated Press that at least one CBS station, WEYI in Flint, Mich., had agreed to Mobil's terms for broadcast of the Royal Shakespeare Company adaptation of Charles Dickens' novel, then refused to sign a contract to carry the show . . . "We have speculated, based on various events, that perhaps they had been pressured," Schmertz said. . . A spokesman for CBS Broadcast Group, George Schweitzer, denied that stations had been subjected to any more than the normal pressures of competition for air time . . . "It happens all the time," said Schweitzer, "with Billy Graham, Operation Prime Time and any others who want to sell programs to stations. There's nothing wrong with trying to make a sale, but we're selling our schedule, too" . . . CBS has two made-for-TV movies, "Kentucky Woman" and "An Invasion of Privacy," scheduled during the four nights . . . Jankowski sent Schmertz a telegram in which he said, "I can sympathize with your inability to sell your programs. I suggest you try other stations in the market" . . .