Concert pianist Rosalyn Tureck, who expressed outrage about the "celebrity" advertising for her upcoming DAR Constitutional Hall Bach concert on Sunday, has now canceled the concert because of an "inflammation of her hand," according to Tureck's business manager, Hattie Clark, of Columbia Artists Management in New York.

Tureck has been at odds with Norman Darden, a New York promoter who set up the concert, over what she considers inappropriate publicity--especially an advertisement that said the audience "will include Hollywood stars, Broadway producers, diplomats, government elite and the REDSKINS." Darden was quoted yesterday as saying that he had given free tickets to some Redskins.

Clark said Tureck is getting a "physician's statement. He won't allow her to use the hand for at least three weeks."

Darden said yesterday, "Her hand is swollen? Yes, I know how much it is. This is serious. Oh, this is outrageous . . . I've sunk $30,000 into this. I tell you, this is really something bad." AROUND TOWN:

Washington author Paul Dickson, who has written and published 14 books, from "The Great American Ice Cream Book" to his latest, "There Are Alligators in Our Sewers," written with Joseph Goulden, may have at last achieved true fame. Dickson has been accepted into the "Guinness Book of World Records." And he has achieved that ultimate recognition by compiling some 2,241 synonyms for the "drunken state." Some of the most recent words added to his growing list include: crushed, gestunketed, kursasted, rockaputzered, mushy, on a fools errand . . .

There were several people in the Kennedy Center audience a couple of weeks ago who might have had some new words to add to Dickson's list. During the second performance of the Metropolitan Opera's "Der Rosenkavalier," a man sitting only a few aisles away from conductor James Levine made noises and negative comments about the opera while drinking from a bottle he had with him. Security people led away the unidentified man during intermission following the first act after several members of the audience complained. Although it was the kind of heckling Levine and company have probably not run into before, there was no indication anyone on stage noticed, and contrary to the man's opinion, the critics loved the performance . . .

Emanuel, one of the best-known maitre d's in town, has left the Madison Hotel's Montpelier Room to join the new Four Ways Restaurant just north of Dupont Circle. Emanuel had been the maitre d' at Paul Young's restaurant for 20 years. George Sardeli, who had been at the Four Ways, returned to Il Nuovo Sans Souci . . .

House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel is in satisfactory condition at Bethesda Naval Hospital after having a ruptured appendix removed Tuesday night. Mike Johnson, the Illinois Republican's spokesman, said there were no complications . . .

A black tie ball recognizing the 37th anniversary of CARE, the international development relief organization, will be held at the Organization of American States tonight. The Alejandro Orfilas and the Douglas Fairbankses are the honorary chairpersons of the evening.

It's going to be a different Fourth of July in Washington if yesterday's kickoff tribute is any indication. It was held to honor House Speaker Tip O'Neill, who is advisory board chairman for the event, and Rep. Jack Kemp, advisory vice chairman. Since Jhoon Rhee, famed tae kwon do instructor, is the national chairman of the Fourth of July Festival, the Congressional Tae Kwon Do Club held a sparring match between Rep. Bill Chappell Jr. and world light heavyweight champion Jeff Smith. Reps. Bob Livingston, Dan Lungren, Clay Shaw and Toby Roth and former Rep. Richard Ichord also sparred with black belt instructors. That certainly sounds a lot more physically dangerous than rock music . . .

Just when you thought it was safe to read Personalities again and not find an item about the royals . . . a tanned and relaxed Charles and Diana, traveling as Mr. and Mrs. Smith, got off a private jet at Miami International Airport after 10 days in the Bahamas and quietly boarded a British Airways flight back to London and chubby cheeks Prince William, who probably wonders why it takes them so long to come home.

Gary Arnold, the conservative Republican who heckled President Reagan at a White House reception in October for "abandoning" his party and whom the president told to shut up, is running for office again.

Arnold was unsuccessful in running for Congress from his Santa Cruz County, Calif., home district. Now he is one of 14 who have filed for the June 21 special election to replace the late Rep. Phillip Burton. END NOTES:

Actors Richard Burton, Brian Aherne and Zoe Caldwell and producer Alexander Cohen were among the crowd honoring the inductees in the Theater Hall of Fame Monday in New York City. The living inductees are director Peter Brook, actress Mildred Dunnock, drama critic Walter Kerr and playwrights Neil Simon and Sidney Kingsley. Posthumously honored were producer Kermit Bloomgarden, actress Mrs. John Drew, playwrights Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur and composer Vincent Youmans . . .

If it ever becomes a trend, the Georgetown Safeway might go out of business. Secretary of State George Shultz stopped off at Ireland's Shannon Airport en route to Washington from meetings of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and two weeks in the Middle East. He went to the duty-free shop where he bought 10 pounds of bacon, 6 pounds of sausages, 5 jars of marmalade and 3 sides of salmon for a total of $120. "He is one of our best customers," a clerk in the shop explained . . .