Ten Washington artists who have met regularly to exchange views in each other's studios for the past two years comprise the group show this month at the Art Barn (2401 Tilden St. NW). It is an interesting show. There is, most definitely, no shared style.

Jeanne F.P. Mitnick's paintings present a fascinating, if not wholly satisfying, blend of realistically rendered nude figures involved in nocturnal dances against flat, tightly patterned, jewel-like (and Klimt-like) grounds. Shahla Arbabi exhibits small, abstract-expressionist collages that are very large in feeling. Lynn Schmidt shows two facets of her art in an arresting untitled painting of a six-fingered red "glove" poised against a dark, brushy background, and in a series of colorful small sculptures that wittily transform the still-life tradition. Carol Gigliotti's paintings deal with the relationship between animals and humans. Her works are not entirely successful in esthetic terms, but the message is complex and compelling.

Also in the exhibition, which continues through Saturday, are works by Kate Curry, Joyce DeBaggio, Cheryl Audet-Lavote, Laura Peery, Randi Trinka and Sandra Troyer. CAPTION: Picture 1, "Magicians Carried Off the Body of May," by Anastasia Seremetis. Group Show at the Art Barn

Ten Washington artists who have met regularly to exchange views in each other's studios for the past two years comprise the group show this month at the Art Barn (2401 Tilden St. NW). It is an interesting show. There is, most definitely, no shared style.

Jeanne F.P. Mitnick's paintings present a fascinating, if not wholly satisfying, blend of realistically rendered nude figures involved in nocturnal dances against flat, tightly patterned, jewel-like (and Klimt-like) grounds. Shahla Arbabi exhibits small, abstract-expressionist collages that are very large in feeling. Lynn Schmidt shows two facets of her art in an arresting untitled painting of a six-fingered red "glove" poised against a dark, brushy background, and in a series of colorful small sculptures that wittily transform the still-life tradition. Carol Gigliotti's paintings deal with the relationship between animals and humans. Her works are not entirely successful in esthetic terms, but the message is complex and compelling.

Also in the exhibition, which continues through Saturday, are works by Kate Curry, Joyce DeBaggio, Cheryl Audet-Lavote, Laura Peery, Randi Trinka and Sandra Troyer.