Science and art met on good terms Saturday night at the National Academy of Sciences with the concert by the National Musical Arts.

The program opened with the Beethoven Sonata, Op. 102, No. 1, for cello, piano and tap shoes. Patricia Gray played the awkward piano part with ease and grace. David Hardy did cello and foot-tap. The cello was fine, but the foot-tap is not in Beethoven's score. It is a bad reflex that must be restrained.

The Crumb "Voice of the Whale" has sea-fared well since its 1971 premiere. A work of color and effect, it is also good music. The players gave a highly colored performance, but more attention should have been given to less strident sound and a better level of the necessary amplification.

The young performers sailed into the Brahms String Sextet as if they owned it. The melodies sang, rhythms were buoyant and there were great moments, thanks especially to the viola of Karen Dreyfus. Brahms seemed the most progressive composer on the program. -- Ed Mattos fine, but the foot-tap is not in Beethoven's score. It is a bad reflex that must be restrained.

The Crumb "Voice of the Whale" has sea-fared well since its 1971 premiere. A work of color and effect, it is also good music. The players gave a highly colored performance, but more attention should have been given to less strident sound and a better level of the necessary amplification.

The young performers sailed into the Brahms String Sextet as if they owned it. The melodies sang, rhythms were buoyant and there were great moments, thanks especially to the viola of Karen Dreyfus. Brahms seemed the most progressive composer on the program.