The National Housewives Association, a British women's group, is preparing to break British law to protest what it considers too much sex and violence in American television soap operas "Dallas" and "Dynasty." The group plans to withhold part of the $51 annual license fee all television owners must pay. The president of the association, Irene Watson, who expresses a willingness to go to jail over the issue, says sex scenes should be excised from "Dallas" and "Dynasty" before they are shown in Britain. If that ever happens, British television will have a lot of dead time to fill . . .

Singer Diana Ross has bowed out of a slated performance at President Reagan's inaugural gala Saturday because of other engagements. Another singer, Sarah Vaughan, also turned down an opportunity to perform before an inaugural salute to volunteers. Vaughan is appearing through the weekend at Charlie's Georgetown . . .

Apparently the new resident at the White House, the three-month-old purebred Bouvier puppy, Lucky, is a bit of a problem for the staff. It seems that Lucky, whom the Reagans took to Camp David this weekend, is still not housebroken. One White House source said that while Lucky's not a chronic violator, she "isn't very reliable yet" . . .

And in a move that will bring still more admiration for quality programming, the British Broadcasting Corp. broadcast the crowning of Miss Great Britain 1985 Friday and, with it, ended its involvement with pageants. BBC Channel 1 chief executive Michael Grade said beauty contests do not warrant national air time. "They are an anachronism in this day and age of equality, verging on the offensive" . . .