The nominations are in, and the suspense is mounting. Everybody wants to know which films will walk away with the biggest awards this March: Will it be "Bolero," riding on the strength of its nine nominations? Or will John and Bo Derek's sexy Spanish frolic lose out to Sly Stallone's country singin' in "Rhinestone" or Tanya Roberts' jungle seductress "Sheena, Queen of the Jungle"? As ought to be clear by now, these aren't Oscar contenders but nominees for the considerably less prestigious Golden Raspberry Awards, the annual celebration -- if that's the right word -- of the worst that Hollywood has to offer.

The competition this year is stiff. "Bolero" is the heavy favorite, picking up nominations in nine of the 10 categories and going up against "Rhinestone," "Sheena," "Cannonball Run II" and "Where the Boys Are" for Worst Picture. Bo, naturally, is up for Worst Actress, as are Roberts, Brooke Shields ("Sahara") and a pair of performers more accustomed to the kind of awards found on mantels -- Faye Dunaway ("Supergirl") and Shirley MacLaine ("Cannonball Run II"). Nominees for Worst Actor are Stallone, Lorenzo Lamas ("Body Rock"), Jerry Lewis ("Slapstick of Another Kind"), Burt Reynolds ("Cannonball Run II" and "City Heat") and another guy generally in more honored company, Peter O'Toole ("Supergirl").

The winners -- a loose use of the term -- will be announced at a ceremony March 24, the day before those other awards. Connoisseurs of trash, meanwhile, will be happy to know that unlike the Academy Award contenders, nearly all the major Golden Raspberry nominees have already been released on videocassette . . .

A fitting capper to the Oscar circus ran on the back page of Daily Variety a week ago, the day after the nominations were announced. The full-page ad featured a picture of Charles Durning in his clerical garb from "Mass Appeal" and a one-word message from the actor who has been nominated several times in the past, though not this year. His postnomination benediction: "Amen" . . .

If you fondly remember lines like "Colonel Mustard did it in the library with a candlestick," you're ready for a film Paramount will be releasing next year. "Clue," based on Parker Brothers' long-lasting mystery game, comes to the big screen courtesy of Paramount Pictures, British director Jonathan Lynn and "Halloween" producer Debra Hill. Hill has been working on the idea for five years, though she's had problems turning a board game into a movie script -- for help, she's turned to a dozen different writers, including composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim, British mystery novelist P.D. James and playwright Tom Stoppard. The movie, she says, will be set in 1954 and will be "funny but scary." Now, how about "Trivial Pursuit: The Motion Picture" . . .

According to producer Menahem Golan, Charles Bronson ended his holdout and agreed to star in "Death Wish III" not because of any substantial changes in the script he'd previously criticized, but because the Bernhard Goetz incident convinced him that the exceptionally violent, neighborhood-wide battle that ends the movie is true to life . . . 20th Century-Fox has sued Kathleen Turner for holding out over "Jewel of the Nile," the "Romancing the Stone" sequel for which Fox says she wants "vastly increased sums." The studio wants to keep Turner from starring in Steven Spielberg's "The Money Pit." Turner's lawyer says she's already lost that part . . . French producer Herve Bourges has announced that Orson Welles will direct and star in "King Lear," which will be filmed in France and partly financed by the government . . .

Peter Weir's "Witness" had the biggest opening weekend of any film this year, making $4.5 million in the face of some complaints from the Amish community in which the Harrison Ford film is set. But it didn't capture first place on the box-office charts, because that's still held by "Beverly Hills Cop," which made $6.2 million in its first weekend last year and topped the $150 million mark after 68 days, one day more than it took last summer's hit "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" to pass that mark . . .