There was a bit of Hollywood in Atlanta Monday night for the premiere of Neil Simon's "Slugger's Wife," a melodrama about the roller-coaster marriage between an Atlanta Braves slugger (Michael O'Keefe) and a rock singer (Rebecca DeMornay). Braves owner Ted Turner, who had played himself in the movie but ended up on the cutting room floor, was at the $75-a-head gala to benefit the city's High Museum of Art. The glittery crowd included Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young, producer Ray Stark, O'Keefe and DeMornay and top Coca-Cola executives . . .

U.S. postal inspectors are continuing their investigation looking for an unidentified man who mailed Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis a loaded pistol and 40 bullets Monday. The package was sent to the Park Avenue address in Manhattan where she works as an editor at the Doubleday publishing company . . .

There's another society pianist in town. George Cort, who has played some of the more famous rooms in the country -- the Waldorf-Astoria's Empire Room, the St. Regis-Sheraton's Maisonette, the Plaza Hotel's Persian Room, Rockefeller Plaza's Rainbow Grille and Miami Beach's Fountainbleau Hotel -- has begun working the Fairfax Room of the Ritz Carlton . . .

During last week's Phil Donahue interview taped locally at WDVM with each of seven governors attempting to get General Motors' new Saturn production plant located in his respective state, Minnesota Gov. Rudy Perpich at least twice referred to Donahue as "Hugh." Donahue didn't correct him or even acknowledge the mistake. What Donahue couldn't have known is that when Perpich worked in Austria at Control Data Corp.'s Vienna office, the Control Data vice president for international trade relations was a Hugh Donaghue . . .

Swedish film director Ingmar Bergman yesterday received the rank of commander of France's Legion of Honor from President Francois Mitterrand in recognition of his 40 years of work in the cinema . . .

Much of Plains, Ga., is scheduled for preservation as the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site, but not on the list is probably the most famous landmark of all, brother Billy Carter's gas station. When asked about it, the former first brother, now a vice president of a mobile home manufacturer, said the exclusion of the service station didn't bother him. "I don't care if they bulldoze the whole town" . . .