Playboy publisher Hugh Hefner said yesterday he suffered a slight stroke two weeks ago. He blamed it on the stress caused by Peter Bogdanovich's book, "The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten," which accuses Hefner of luring the centerfold into a life style that resulted in her death. Bogdanovich responded with a statement that said, "I'm sorry if making him face it had something to do with making him sick. I feel a lot worse for the human cost paid by all the women who don't issue press releases" . . .

Actor and former football star Jim Brown was formally charged yesterday in the rape and assault of a woman last month at his Hollywood Hills home . . .

Also in Los Angeles: A court ruled yesterday that National Enquirer reporter Anthony Brenna must testify at the preliminary hearing for Cathy Evelyn Smith, who is accused of murder in the drug death of John Belushi . . .

It's probably logical to go from White House aide to political consultant to owner of a Washington flower shop. That's what Bob Bonitati has done in opening Bird's Florist shop. But, in a typically Washington move, a smart businessman realizes the business should be nonpartisan, so Bonitati has brought in well-known Democrat Vic Kamber as a partner. In a letter to 1,000 of his friends and clients, Kamber wrote about his new venture: "In typical Washington fashion, a Republican and a Democrat are working together -- with the Republican enjoying a controlling interest" . . .

Joan (of art) Mondale will soon be seen on television and heard on radio with a public service advertisement she filmed Monday for a Folger Theatre benefit dinner dance next month. The woman who missed her chance at becoming first lady in November took to the Folger stage to entice supporters of the Shakespeare theater to celebrate the Folger's 15th anniversary $75-per-ticket black-tie dance on April 13 at Bloomingdale's White Flint store . . .

Patrick Butler, a former speechwriter for President Gerald Ford who has worked with such leading Republican figures as Henry Kissinger, former senator Howard Baker and Sen. Robert Dole, has been elected vice president of the Times Mirror Co. . . .

Former senator Paul Tsongas, who decided to return home to Massachusetts when he was told last year he had lymphatic system cancer, said he does miss the hurly-burly of Washington. In his recent book, "Heading Home," he writes that if he had stayed in the Senate, he would have become a "power addict." Now practicing law, he said the best letter he has received recently included the line: "No one on his death bed ever said, 'I wish I had spent more time on my business.' " . . .