Michael Jackson arrived in London yesterday on a trip to the British Isles especially to view his statue in Madame Tussaud's Wax Museum. Not impressed by the rock superstar, British customs officers at Heathrow Airport subjected the singer to a 35-minute search of his clothes and baggage. Their usual experience with rock singers undoubtedly did not prepare them to handle the squeaky-clean Jackson, who smiled as he walked through the "nothing to declare" gate saying: "I don't mind being searched. Why should I? There was nothing to find" . . .

One of Britain's greatest actors, Sir Michael Redgrave, was remembered at a nonreligious funeral service Tuesday. His fellow actors attending celebrated his life with readings and songs. Ian Charleson "Chariots of Fire" sang "My Time of Day" from "Guys and Dolls," one of Redgrave's favorites. Among the mourners were Sir Alec Guinness, Maggie Smith, Dorothy Tutin, Christopher Reeve and violinist Yehudi Menuhin . . .

It's a good thing DeWitt and Lilah Wallace aren't alive to see it. The late publishers of Reader's Digest, a magazine dedicated to conservative American virtues, wouldn't want to know that Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione has put a $5.5 million bid on their former New York estate . . .

More than a dozen newspapers did not think Sunday's "Bloom County" comic strip by Berke Breathed that parodied a Dewar's scotch whisky advertisement was funny. The Raleigh, N.C., News and Observer refused to run it, arguing that it wasn't appropriate for children . . .