What kind of radio listener are you?

Talk-show listeners, according to Radio Wars, a 1983 National Association of Broadcasters' report, "like someone serious they can 'look up to.' They are radio's most unique listeners. Unlike all others, they don't listen to be 'cheered up' . . . they listen to engage their minds."

The report's view of other listeners:

News/Talk Listeners: "Feel they know more about news than other people, and they listen to maintain that edge . . . to learn things they can use to impress others."

Serious Sophisticates: "Listen exclusively to think and learn. Even more than other News/Talk fans, they want a radio station that 'rocks the boat.' Give them serious news and in-depth analysis. . . Avoid light talk and 'soft' human interest features."

Cheerful Quickies: "Want a quick update on the news," so NAB recommends a "cheerful, laid-back, folksy-sounding" format "with a lot of light talk and features."

Voyeurs: The "Peeping Toms" of radio. . . "listen to eavesdrop on other people's problems. In addition to News/Talk, they're heavy Country radio listeners who pay attention to the words . . . songs about divorce and drinking clearly appeal to their psychology.

"Give them more talk shows than straight news . . . preferably featuring psychologists, doctors, lawyers and sex therapists. Your experts should be cheerful and folksy, but very authoritative." Listening In

What kind of radio listener are you?

Talk-show listeners, according to Radio Wars, a 1983 National Association of Broadcasters' report, "like someone serious they can 'look up to.' They are radio's most unique listeners. Unlike all others, they don't listen to be 'cheered up' . . . they listen to engage their minds."

The report's view of other listeners:

News/Talk Listeners: "Feel they know more about news than other people, and they listen to maintain that edge . . . to learn things they can use to impress others."

Serious Sophisticates: "Listen exclusively to think and learn. Even more than other News/Talk fans, they want a radio station that 'rocks the boat.' Give them serious news and in-depth analysis. . . Avoid light talk and 'soft' human interest features."

Cheerful Quickies: "Want a quick update on the news," so NAB recommends a "cheerful, laid-back, folksy-sounding" format "with a lot of light talk and features."

Voyeurs: The "Peeping Toms" of radio. . . "listen to eavesdrop on other people's problems. In addition to News/Talk, they're heavy Country radio listeners who pay attention to the words . . . songs about divorce and drinking clearly appeal to their psychology.

"Give them more talk shows than straight news . . . preferably featuring psychologists, doctors, lawyers and sex therapists. Your experts should be cheerful and folksy, but very authoritative."