Tomorrow is opening day for "Girls Just Want to Have Fun," a comedy about teen-agers in a strict private school that is, you might think, based on Cyndi Lauper's hit song of the same name. Well, the New World picture was certainly inspired by Lauper's hit, but you won't hear Cyndi's voice in the movie or find her name anywhere in the credits.

Lauper declined to participate in the project, so the producers simply bought the rights to the song from Robert Hazard, the original writer of "Girls Just Want to Have Fun." There's only one problem: Hazard's song wasn't the same song that became a nationwide hit. "The title was different, the melody lines were different, the feel was different and it meant something else," said Lauper when her record came out. The original song, she says, was written from a male point of view.

Lauper "smushed parts together, put a melody line where there wasn't one," changed some lyrics and came up with the neofeminist anthem -- but she did do without taking a cowriting credit. The producers of "Girls Just Want to Have Fun" now have a movie that features the original, unenlightened lyrics, and they say nobody will notice the difference.

Lauper, meanwhile, is into a bigger-budget project: she wrote and sang the title track of "Goonies," the Steven Spielberg-produced, Richard Donner-directed tale of young outcasts and their elaborate adventures . . .

It's been in the works for an awfully long time without ever really getting off the ground, but "Dick Tracy" may finally make it to the big screen. Long after Elaine May and Herb Gardner wrote the script for the comic strip hero's film debut; long after Walter Hill agreed to direct; long after Hill dropped out; and long after Warren Beatty signed on to play the title role, the film is still in the works at Paramount -- and now Martin Scorsese is reportedly ready to direct.

If Scorsese can fit it into his schedule, it's because his own long-in-the-works project -- "The Last Temptation of Christ" -- died a premature death some time ago . . .

First, Leonard Nimoy was hired to direct "Star Trek III" (and then rehired for the same chores in the upcoming "Star Trek IV"). Now, Anthony Perkins is getting a chance to sit behind the camera -- and borrowing a page from the "Star Trek" book, Perkins is doing so with "Psycho III," the further adventures of Norman Bates and his Bates Motel. Universal says it will be out early next year . . .

"Beverly Hills Cop" passed the $200 million mark in film grosses early this week, which makes it the second highest grossing comedy ever. But it shouldn't stay in second place for long: the current leader, "Ghostbusters," has grossed $220 million, putting it within easy reach of Eddie Murphy and crew. After all, 'Cop' made $3 million last weekend even though it's been out for more than four months and despite what was a stronger weekend for church-going than movie-going . . .

And speaking of church, at one Roman Catholic church near Palm Springs (with a building partially financed and designed by director Franco Zeffirelli), Frank Sinatra and Gregory Peck did the scripture readings, Cary Grant and Roger Moore passed the collection baskets and director Frank Capra sat in the congregation. Non-movie folks like Prince Albert of Monaco and Miss U.S.A. 1984 were also on hand. And they say Swifty Lazar's Oscar party was the place to see stars . . .