Rose Narva, probably the best-known hotel manager in Washington, has signed a contract with Edward Bennett Williams to return to his hotel, the Jefferson, as its managing director. Narva had run that hotel before and most recently was manager of the Hay-Adams. She's also been at the Sheraton Park and the Sheraton-Carlton . . .

A number of people know that entertainer Bob Hope comes from Cleveland. What few know is that he was once a boxer, fighting under the name of Packy East. Hope was getting onto an elevator Monday night at the Washington Hilton, where he addressed the annual U.S. Chamber of Commerce dinner. Also on the elevator was Washington lobbyist Roy Meyers, who is from Cleveland and was once Sen. Howard Metzenbaum's press secretary. When he saw Hope, he extended his hand and said, "Gee, it's good to see you, Packy East." Hope took his hand as he broke up with laughter and said, "You must be from Cleveland, too" . . .

Singer Jerry Lee Lewis, who has had his share of medical problems recently, is listed in critical but stable condition at Methodist Hospital in Memphis, where he is undergoing treatment for a stomach problem that caused internal bleeding . . . Patrick Hayes, director emeritus of the Washington Performing Arts Society, is in good condition at Georgetown Hospital, where he is recovering from heart surgery . . .

Raymond Bonner, author of "Weakness and Deceit: U.S. Policy and El Salvador," is the winner of the fifth annual Robert F. Kennedy Book Award. He will receive the $2,500 first prize tomorrow at Hickory Hill, the home of the Robert F. Kennedy family . . .

U.S. District Judge William Keller in Los Angeles Monday refused to dismiss a libel suit against author Bob Woodward for alleged falsehoods in his book "Wired: The Short Life and Fast Times of John Belushi." The libel suit was brought by Dr. Robert J. Feder, a Beverly Hills ear, nose and throat specialist, who said Woodward, a Washington Post assistant managing editor, was wrong in writing that the doctor had given Belushi and other celebrity patients amphetamines on demand when they needed the drugs to perform . . .

U.S. Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Larry E. Smith is to join the growing government operations arm of the Burson-Marsteller public relations firm as a vice president. He joins former secretary to the Senate minority Patrick J. Griffin, who is a senior vice president with the company . . .