An annual 5 percent salary raise was a feature of the new three-year contract agreed to late Friday between Channel 9 management and negotiators for the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) . . .

The pact affects about 30 on-air reporters, anchors, writers and assistant directors at the station . . .

The negotiations reportedly went down to the wire and were finalized only after a flurry of last-minute phone calls by management to headquarters of the Evening News Association in Detroit . . .

News director Dave Pearce reportedly would have stepped into anchor Gordon Peterson's large shoes if a strike had been called . . .

Station manager Ron Townsend said yesterday that "both sides had to give something. We're just glad it's over" . . .

In key concessions, aside from the wage package, management withdrew its demand to reduce severance benefits substantially for high-pay employes and increased its contribution to welfare and pension funds from 8.5 percent to 9 percent . . .

The union agreed to let management institute a second tier of lower salaries for beginning writers but retained current salary scales for its regular writers . . .

One emotional issue -- permitting producers to write those 10-second promotional teasers for upcoming news stories, including news breaks -- went to the company, which contends they are "promotion" material and not "news." On-air journalists at the station contend that the teasers are too often "hype" that can "embarrass" news personnel who have to read them on the air . . .

However, the company dropped a related demand that producers and executive producers be permitted to write "news" stories in some instances . . .

Actress Selma Diamond, who plays raspy-voiced court matron Selma Hacker on NBC's "Night Court," was in critical condition yesterday with lung cancer, according to a spokesman for Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles . . .

" 'She's at a very advanced stage of her disease, it's just a question of time," said spokesman Ron Wise . . .

Miss Diamond, 64, a heavy smoker, usually has a cigarette hanging from her mouth in the NBC series. . .

NBC publicity director Bill Kiely said Diamond completed filming of the last script of the season about four to six weeks ago. A spokesman for Warner Bros. television said she had been "in and out of hospitals since January" and entered Cedars-Sinai May 1 when her condition deteriorated . . .

Miss Diamond's movie credits include "All of Me," "My Favorite Year" and "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" . . .

Her theater credits include "Bye, Bye Birdie," "Barefoot in the Park" and "Don't Drink the Water" . . . Also in the News

A few details have leaked from that luncheon meeting Thursday between about a dozen on-air women ABC News correspondents and ABC News President Roone Arledge in New York. . .

The women used the occasion to air grievances about what they believe is unequal treatment by the network -- including a failure to promote women, especially among the technical crews, to management positions; a presence on such prestige ABC News public affairs programs as "Nightline" and "This Week With David Brinkley"; and a general shortage of on-air time, etc. . . .

The discussions lasted four hours and broke only because everybody had to get ready to attend the American Women in Radio and Television dinner that night where ABC correspondent Barbara Walters received a Silver Satellite Award for being "the role model of so many broadcasters" . . .

The extended lunch was deemed successful enough, in fact, that another such meeting with top ABC News management has been tentatively scheduled for Septem- ber . . .

One management observer told us Friday that "generally, I think things went very well. Roone was forthright with his views and Carole Simpson was very impressive in her presentation. I understand it was a pretty good exchange, all in all" . . .

Leonard Goldenson, ABC Inc. board chairman, and ABC Inc. President Fred Pierce, who dropped by before the lunch began, didn't stay around for the complaint period ("it was a News meeting and they didn't want to interfere," a management aide told us Friday) . . .

Arledge, en route to Tel Aviv for a meeting of overseas correspondents, was unavailable for comment on Friday . . .

On another front, the National Organization for Women's Legal Defense and Education Fund has launched a direct-mail appeal to 400,000 supporters asking for funds to help finance its legal actions on behalf of plaintiffs in pending sexual-discrimination and/or harassment suits brought against CBS, ABC and Metromedia, among others . . .

The immediate goal is to raise some $35,000 on behalf of Cecily Coleman -- a former ABC executive whose $1 million sexual-harassment suit against the network is slated to go to trial here in late June . . .

Meanwhile, the NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund is stepping up efforts to contact broadcast organizations, such as ABC, CBS and Metromedia, currently involved in merger or hostile-takeover situations, to alert them that NOW intends to press for compliance to Title VIII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act when broadcasters go before the various federal agencies involved in such transfers . . .

As part of the campaign, Coleman and former anchor Christine Craft (whose appeal is pending before the U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals as she seeks restoration of a sex discrimination verdict and the orginal $500,000 award she won in 1983 against Metromedia) will appear at a 5:30 p.m. reception to be held here tomorrow at 11 Dupont Circle NW . . . Wait, There's More

Including a couple of leftover notes from last week's ABC affiliate meeting in New York where everybody toasted the new fall schedule . . .

Carol Burnett is set to star in her first comedy special for that network; Drew Barrymore will star in a two-hour female version of Tom Sawyer-Huck Finn; David L. Wolper will produce a two-hour TV movie based on "Times of My Life," the autobiography of former first lady Betty Ford; and the network plans a five-hour mini-series based on Michael Korda's current best seller "Queenie," which is loosely based on the life of his aunt, Merle Oberon . . .

And, gosh, the network took over all the third-floor ballrooms of the New York Hilton on Wednesday so the affiliates could meet all the ABC stars. Bruce Willis, costar (with Cybill Shepherd) of "Moonlighting," played his harmonica for anybody who would listen!!! . . .

Advertising circles in New York are buzzing with reports that a 30-second commercial on NBC's "The Cosby Show" next fall will command $200,000 (there are six such spots per show), quite a jump from the $116,000 per the network asked when the program first went on the air last fall -- and before it turned out to be the biggest hit on primetime TV . . .

Last fall, CBS' "60 Minutes" was the ad champ, receiving $190,000 per 30 seconds, followed closely by ABC's "Dynasty" at $187,000 and NBC's "The A-Team," which got $167,000 . . .

Word out of Hollywood is that Columbia Pictures-TV has allocated $2 million for a spring-summer promotion campaign to push those "Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer" reruns . . .

A Columbia executive says CBS has promised the series could come back in January if, during its current nine-week run, it manages to finish at least second in its 10 p.m. Saturday time slot . . .

No results from this past Saturday's show, but the first week, up against a fresh two-hour "Love Boat" and NBC's "Hunter," "Mike" finished third, with a mere 10.5 rating and a 19 percent audience share, compared with a 15/28 for "Love Boat" and an 11.6/21 for a fresh episode of "Hunter" . . .

Add May 16 winners of award certificates from the metropoliatan area mass media committee of the American Association of University Women: Channel 9 reporters Cindy DiBiasi, for her series on teen suicides, and Jane Van Ryan, for her series on the aged, "Journey Into Fear" . . .