Woody Allen won a suit against National Video Inc. last Thursday. The well-known writer-actor objected to National's advertisements, in which Allen look-alike Phil Boroff appears holding a National Video V.I.P. card. Allen claimed the ad violated federal law on misleading advertising and his right to privacy. In her decision, U.S. District Chief Judge Constance Baker Motley agreed that the ad was misleading because Boroff's hairstyle and expression were characteristic of the "endearing schlemiel" Allen portrayed in his early movies . . .

When a Columbus Zoo veterinarian discovered a white tiger cub's legs were curving outward and were in danger of becoming deformed from the cub's lying on the hard floor of the tiger den, Suzi Hanna, wife of zoo director Jack Hanna, volunteered to take care of it. The unnamed cub has made herself at home, sleeping in the bedroom, while Jack Hanna has retired to the guest room. "I'm a light sleeper," he said. "I can't sleep with both a woman and a tiger." . . .

Thai state-run radio and television stations began a government-imposed ban Saturday on "One Night in Bangkok," a Top-10 song on U.S. and British pop music charts. The song, which extols the sexual and tourist attractions of the Thai capital, has been on Thailand's airwaves for two months. Pramut Sutabutr, Mass Communications Organization director, said "One Night in Bangkok" could cause misunderstandings about the kingdom. "Some of the lyrics also showed disrespect to our national religion, Buddhism," he said . . .