That final episode of the season of "Dynasty" on ABC Wednesday night came up with a 25.9 Nielsen rating and a 39 percent audience share in the national ratings . . .

Depending on how well that "Dallas" farewell fared on Friday night, that should be good enough for numero uno in this week's national ratings . . .

The rumor at NBC News is that Chris Wallace's appearance on "Meet the Press" yesterday, subbing for Roger Mudd as coanchor, may have signaled the latter's departure from the Sunday public affairs show . . . as Mudd buckles down to getting that new prime-time magazine show, "American Almanac," into shape for its August debut (and yes, NBC News finally decided to go along with Mudd and call it "American" and not "America's" almanac) . . .

And another rumor from Broadcast Row: that CBS News will "make an announcement" in June about the status of "CBS Morning News" coanchor Bill Kurtis . . . reportedly unhappy about, among other things, the failure of a couple of his European pieces to get on the air during President Reagan's recent trip . . .

Incidentally, the "Morning News" move to London all that week didn't produce any ratings breakthrough . . .

The guess -- denied by CBS News spokeswoman Ann Morfogen -- is that Kurtis will be leaving to accept one of those high-paying anchor jobs in Chicago . . . but then we've been through these Kurtis-Unhappy-at-CBS News stories before, have we not, TV Column fans? . . .

Now that Corporation for Public Broadcasting President Edward J. Pfister has resigned over what some deemed a "political decision" last week by the CPB board to withdraw its support of a September trade delegation to Moscow, conjecture arises over a possible successor . . .

There was talk Friday out in San Francisco, where the public broadcasters were meeting when the CPB balloon went up, that David Ives, the man who guided WGBH in Boston to its lofty status within the PBS system and is now semiretired, might be the interim choice . . .

The idea appeals to higher-ups at PBS, who believe that the naming of a person of Ives' stature might help to start the healing process in what threatens to become a major breach within the public broadcasting "family" . . .

Ives, coincidentally, earlier last week was the recipient of the CPB board's Ralph Lowell Award, considered to be public TV's highest "recognition of merit" . . .

The CPB board is to meet in late June, according to one San Francisco source, but the annual election of officers is usually held in September . . .

The early word is that CPB will go outside its own ranks for an interim president, although CPB programming fund boss Ron Hull's name was being mentioned should the choice remain in house . . .

Incidentally, although Pfister offered to resign as of the end of December, the board told him to clean out his desk by June 15, but apparently will pay him the annual $81,000 salary through the end of the year, anyway . . .

Pfister had been on shaky ground at CPB ever since Reagan appointee Sonia Landau replaced Democrat Sharon Rockefeller last year as board chairman. It was widely thought within the industry then that his re-election as president for another year last fall was designed only to forestall the impression of a Landau housecleaning at CPB upon her takeover. Pfister and Landau had clashed prior to her election as chairman . . .

There was some talk this weekend that the House telecommunications subcommittee might look into the uproar . . .

Meanwhile, PBS President Bruce Christensen said Friday that PBS is talking to the CPB Office of International Activities -- whose support for the Moscow trip was canceled by Wednesday's 6-to-4 CPB board vote -- "trying to figure out if PBS can step in and be the sponsoring organization" . . .

Christensen said the bulk of previous trade trip costs have been borne by major foundations (Landau's claim is that it was CPB that attracted the foundation grants and they should be CPB's to dispense). He said "about eight or 10 public station managers" would probably make the Moscow trip, which has already been approved by the State Department. Such trips are designed to buy programs from foreign public broadcasters and sell U.S. public TV product in turn . . .

The original plans for the Moscow trip also included Pfister and David Stewart, who runs the CPB Office of International Activities. Their expenses for the eight-day visit would have been underwritten by CPB . . . For His Part

The departing Pfister on Friday turned the occasion of a previously scheduled State of the Corporation address to a general assembly of broadcasters meeting in the city by the Bay into a kind of Farewell Address, during which he took pains to urge public broadcasters to maintain their independence from political influence . . .

He also chose to disagree with Landau's contention that CPB is a government agency that should not be "negotiating" with a Soviet government-run TV system, considering the current state of relations between the two countries . . .

Pfister said that without independence, "there can be no credibility, no integrity. It is in fact our birthright . . .

"It is so important," he said, "that from the legislative beginning, CPB has been a private entity. For CPB -- which necessarily must be the most independent of all public broadcasting institutions, the example for all and the point of reassurance to the public -- for CPB to foreclose the possibility of increased communications where they realistically exist is just not acceptable to me . . .

"If, in fact, CPB is an entity put in place by the people of this country to assure independent broadcasting decisions . . . then the kinds and the manner of the restriction imposed this week is even less acceptable . . .

"It is my conviction that all of us, including CPB, have a responsibiliy to open channels of communications and to share with others the meaning of life in this free society . . .

"My dream for public broadcasting is that one day you'll be able to use the technology at your disposal to bring together children, families, politicians, from any nation -- even those with whom we may be in disagreement" . . .

Referring to his decision to resign, Pfister told the broadcasters it "was based on my analysis of the board's discussion of the matter. Frankly, I believe that each and every professional public broadcaster in this room would have made the same decision I did" . . . Also in the News

TV star Michael Landon tells People magazine this week that his unhappy childhood as Eugene Orowitz, a "loner, bed-wetter and generally unhappy kid in Collingswood, N.J.," made him want to "get away from my family," especially a suicidal mother who would "stick her head in the oven but she always had knee pads on the floor or one window open . . . 'Gee, if it's Tuesday, it must be suicide' " . . .

They're all aflutter at Channel 4 . . . because NBC Chairman Grant Tinker is coming to call on the 30th, part of a tour he's making of the five NBC-owned TV stations . . .

Tamara Haddad is rejoining Larry King to produce his "Larry King Live" program when it's launched next month on Cable News Network here . . .

She produced King's Mutual Broadcasting System talk show from 1981 to 1984 but joined John McLaughlin as vice president of programming and marketing, as well as producing McLaughlin's two TV talk shows last year . . .

McLaughlin said Friday that no replacement had been chosen . . .

Speaking of CNN, Sandi Freeman, whom CNN replaced as a talk show host with King two weeks ago, appeared as a substitute for Joan Lunden on ABC's "Good Morning America" late last week . . .

Although a few women at ABC News grumbled about going outside the network for a substitute (Lunden was in Morocco doing a feature on Michael Douglas' new film), the general feeling at ABC was applause for choosing a woman with real news credentials . . .

You'll recall that on May 9, ABC News President Roone Arledge met with about a dozen women from ABC News to hear their gripes about air time and promotions . . .

One participant in that four-hour lunch meeting noted Friday that aside from the appearance of Freeman, there was at least one segment every night last week on "ABC World News Tonight With Peter Jennings" reported by a woman correspondent, and suggested that both events hinted that Arledge had taken their complaints seriously . . .

Meanwhile, the crusading women at the ABC News bureau here last week received flowers from the "CBS Washington bureau women." The accompanying card read: "We follow, with great interest, the details of your progress as it appears in the public press. Good work. Keep it up. All the best!" . . .

CBS News has completed its lineup of correspondents for its new prime-time magazine show, "West 57th," and, as expected, it will include Meredith Vieira, Jane Wallace, John Ferrugia and Bob Sirott . . .