And a loose, early summer breakfast nook strap-in probably would be in order for the first item this morning, TV Column fans:

. . . the strong rumor that Channel 7 is interested in obtaining the services of Dave Marash, bearded newscaster on NBC's Channel 4 flagship in New York, as a replacement for current co-anchor David Schoumacher . . .

Schoumacher, in a deal made late last year, is due to phase out most of his anchor duties by this summer when he starts a Saturday night public affairs show on WJLA . . .

We hear that two weekends ago, Marash was in town to do a practice run-through broadcast with co-anchor Renee Poussaint that pleased everybody . . .

"We're real interested in Dave," a WJLA insider said yesterday, adding that in recent days the station has not heard from either Marash or his agent, Richard Liebner . . .

A major obstacle to a WJLA deal is apparently Marash's current contract with WNBC, which reportedly has another year to run. Liebner did not return our calls yesterday . . .

Marash has been with WNBC since January 1983, as a general assignment reporter, after several years at WCBS in New York, where he was an investigative reporter and anchor . . .

A spokesman for WNBC said yesterday that "we have no reason to believe the rumor is true. Dave is a well-respected member of our news team" . . .

This would probably be a good place to mention the local news ratings for the first two weeks of the May ratings sweeps . . . which show Channel 9 ahead from 5 to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, with a 9.6 Nielsen rating and a 26 percent audience share, compared with a 5.2/13 for Channel 4 news at that hour and a 4.6/12 for Channel 7's news, which starts at 5:30 . . .

From 6 to 7, Nine is ahead again with a 10.6/24, compared with a 6.2/14 for Four and a 6.0/14 for Seven . . .

At 11 p.m., as we noted a couple of days ago, Nine leads with an 11.0/26, compared with a 9.8/23 for Four and a 9.1/21 for Seven . . .

Channel Five's news at 10 p.m. is averaging a 5.6/10 . . .

Noon news figures find Nine ahead again with a 7.8/34, compared with a 4.0/18 for Seven, a 3.0/13 for Four and a 2.5/11 for Five . . .

If you look closely and care a lot, Nine's noon news figure is higher than than either Four or Seven gets in the early evening news ratings. If you look even more closely, you've got to give some credit to CBS, which has sandwiched Nine's news between two very popular CBS daytime shows, "The Price Is Right" and "Young and the Restless" . . . Also in the News

A Full Shoe Clerk Alert (as in "let's get the shoe clerks out of this poker game") is being sounded on Madison Avenue these days after the word got out that NBC is asking $550,000 for each 30-second commercial on Super Bowl XX, which airs January XXVI out of New Orleans . . .

Last year ABC charged early time buyers $500,000 per but that rate rose to $520,000 before the broadcast went on the air, probably because of the attractive potential of a San Francisco-Miami duel . . .

As the CBS affiliates meeting wound up in San Francisco yesterday, CBS/Broadcast Group president Gene F. Jankowski introduced a 4-minute MTV tracing the 57 years of the network's history (to the tune of Kenny Rogers' "Through the Years") that ended with J.R.'s tears just last Friday night over the death of his brother Bobby on "Dallas" . . .

The film, which was directed at the "dedicated families" that make up the CBS "family," reportedly had some in the audience of 800 knuckling their eyes, just like J.R. . . .

In speeches before the affiliate representatives from around the country, CBS executive vice president Neal H. Pilson, who is in charge of sports at the network, revealed that "the speculation on the pricing" for the 1988 Summer Olympic Games in Seoul, Korea, "has come down from $1 billion less than 12 months ago to a more responsible neighborhood of $300-to-$400 million, depending on the event schedule" . . .

And CBS executive vice president Van Gordon Sauter, whose duties include oversight of CBS News, paraphrased Cicero . . .

Stevie Wonder and syndicated pop music host Casey Kasem will be at the Eisenhower Theatre at 9:30 this morning along with 1,000 area high school seniors to view a Stevie Wonder music video called "Don't Drive Drunk," which the National Association of Broadcasters will send by satellite to 800 TV stations around the country, starting tomorrow, for use as a public service announcement at the height of the high school prom and graduation season . . .

The video was sponsored by NAB, the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Advertising Council and Chrysler Corp. . . . and was produced by Bob Giraldi, who produced Michael Jackson's famous "Beat It" MTV video . . . Oh Oh!

We feel another poem coming on . . .

This time from ABC White House correspondent Sam Donaldson . . . who got back to the White House yesterday after a trip to Annapolis with the president to learn that CBS correspondent Charles Osgood (he of the bow ties and occasional rhyming news items) had reported on a CBS Radio "news brief" earlier in the day that CBS White House correspondent Bill Plante had asked President Reagan on Tuesday if he'd pounded on the table in frustration over Nicaragua . . .

The question was shouted, of course, by Donaldson, who promptly sat down and wrote a 13-line poem and then called Osgood in New York and read it to him! . . .

The good-natured Osgood listened in silence and when Donaldson was finished, he said, "You work your side of the street and I'll work mine" . . .

Take it from TV Column laureate Captain Airwaves, Donaldson's poem does not threaten Alfred Lord Tennyson's niche in the Poet's Pantheon. To spare breakfast nookers, we'll quote only the last seven lines, which read:

For while some strut and preen their stuff,

By writing poems, both smooth and rough,

My living comes from shouting queries,

Braving ropes, hard-eyed guards and nature's furies.

And so, my friend, forgive I can't,

This morning's broadcast on Reagan's rant,

On which you assigned my work to Bill Plante . . . But Seriously, Folks

Al Warren, publisher of TV Digest and other newsletters about the communications field, celebrated his 65th birthday Saturday night . . .

It's been 40 years since Warren, fresh out of the Navy, joined Martin Codel at TV Digest. The publication was later sold to TV Guide but Warren purchased it back in 1960 . . .

TV Digest and its sister publications employ 50 in Washington, New York and Tokyo . . .

Capping his anniversary year, on June 3 Warren will be named "Newsletter Publisher of the Year" by the Newsletter Association . . .

Rep. James Howard (D-N.J.), chairman of the House Public Works and Transportation Committee, reportedly will introduce a bill today requiring colleges to graduate a certain percentage of its athletes if they want to receive federal funding . . .

And why is this in the TV Column this morning, TV Column fans? Because NBC News says two recent "NBC Nightly News" "special segments" on the problem prompted Howard's action!!! . . .

(I think it's almost time for another poem) . . .