Production employes of the Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network (C-SPAN) have voted 24 to 12 against joining the National Association of Broadcast Engineers & Technicians (NABET), which had sought to organize the unit . . .

Some 37 of C-SPAN's 90 full-time employes were eligible to vote, including master control, field production and graphics personnel, plus engineers . . .

C-SPAN has not had a union unit in its six years of existence . . .

Dr. Linda Reid, who has been doing "Health Watch" segments twice a week on Channel 9's early news, has joined Lifetime Cable Network (and helloooo Dr. Ruth!), where she will appear on several programs, including the "Informathon" . . .

And from our The Suspense Is Killing Me (I Think) file: CBS News President Ed Joyce is expected to announce Friday the plans of "Morning News" coanchor Bill Kurtis . . .

As we've previously reported, Kurtis will probably return to WBBM in Chicago as an anchor while keeping a network hand in with the occasional CBS Report or other documentary . . .

Meanwhile, "Morning News" is looking for a good on-the-air interviewer to replace Kurtis and to coanchor with Phyllis George. In the reorganization that ensues, the new "CBS Early Morning News" anchors, Forrest Sawyer and Faith Daniels, are expected to handle the regular news segments on the 7-to-9 a.m. broadcast . . .

Channel 20 viewers raised some $402,000 last weekend for Children's Hospital here as their share of the national Children's Miracle Network Telethon out of Utah . . . The Washington contribution was up from last year, according to a WDCA executive . . .

Chris Chase, who formerly hosted "Media Watch" on CNN, joins Bill Small, former president of NBC News, on a new daily one-hour cable program devoted entirely to books . . .

"The Book Channel" will be available to cable systems around the country in early 1986 after a lengthy tryout period . . . during which formats will be tested . . .

The program will be an unusual marriage of the book publishing business and TV and will be geared to the sale of books as reflected in the choice of guests for the show, program themes and even the time of the day books are purchased by the audiences . . .

Former CNN executive Reese Schonfeld is in charge of the project . . .

Larry Holland, who has been producer/director at Channel 32 for several years, is leaving to become a producer/director at KDKA, the CBS affiliate in Pittsburgh, working on the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. news shows . . .

No replacement for Holland, a key member of the staff at the Howard University station, has been chosen . . . Wait, There's More

Out at Channel 9, associate producer Lois Dyer has been upped to futures editor, starting on Monday . . .

And Nine's consumer reporter Ellen Kingsley has been chosen to receive the 1985 Consumer Media Award from the Consumer Federation of America . . .

The nation's largest consumer organization is honoring Kingsley "in recognition of her consistent excellence over a period of years in reporting on consumer issues" . . . and cites her reports on a cancer-causing pesticide, indoor air pollution and all-terrain vehicles . . .

The award will be made at the federation's 15th annual awards dinner here, June 19 . . .

Did WRC anchor Bob McBride really say, on his 4:28 p.m. Monday news break, "Coming up on CBS Nightly News?" . . . And Finally

Private funeral services will be held tomorrow in Falmouth, Maine, for Carl Lindemann Jr., who died Monday at the age of 62 after a long illness . . .

He retired as vice president and assistant to the president of CBS Sports last year after six years with that network . . . where he had key roles in the network's relations with the National Football League, the U.S. Tennis Association, the U.S. Olympic Committee and other organizations . . .

Earlier, Mr. Lindemann had spent 15 years as an executive with NBC Sports and it was his pioneering efforts to put major league baseball, the Wimbledon tennis championships, NCAA basketball and college football classics like the Rose and Orange Bowls that put all of television into the big-time sports business . . .

He was a delightful man who managed to convey the sheer fun he had every day, without front, rubbing shoulders with sports legends while doing a variety of just plain behind-the-scenes chores that affected, eventually, every golf, baseball, football and basketball fan who ever watched a game on network television and came to share his enthusiasm for what he or she saw on the box . . .

Neal Pilson, executive vice president of CBS/Broadcast Group, had this to say when Mr. Lindemann died Monday:

"When we lose a person of Carl's professional stature, the list of superlatives so frequently used to describe his life seem inadequate. He was a loving husband and father; a warm and considerate friend and associate; and a respected and fair businessman whose leadership and vision have irrevocably shaped the broadcast medium . . .

"His counsel, his warmth and his prodigious accomplishments within our industry and as well at CBS Sports, will be remembered" . . .