I will never write the name B--- K----- again.

I will never write the name B--- K----- again.

I will never write the name B--- K----- again.

I will never . . .

AIRWAVES! Will you get serious? . . .

. . . Write the name B--- K----- again.

I will never write the . . .

AIRWAVES! . . .

Yes, sir? I was just writing that I will never . . .

I know what you were writing, you idiot. You were writing that you'd never write the name . . .There -- you've got me doing it. Now let's have the TV Column and be quick about it or we may never see the name C------ A------- again, either. Starting like this morning.

Yes, sir! I've got the TV Column right here, sir! . . . and at the very top of the news, sir . . .

Channel 7 will announce today that it's signed Wes Sarginson to replace David Schoumacher as coanchor, with Renee Poussaint, on the weeknight news program . . .

Sarginson will start July 1. Schoumacher, who has been gradually tapering off his anchor chores after seven years at the grind, is due to launch his new Saturday evening public affairs show, "Point-to-Point," on Aug. 10 . . .

If the name Sarginson seems vaguely familiar, well, it should. He and Fred Thomas, now with Channel 4, coanchored the Channel 7 news back in 1974-75, when the station was still called WMAL . . .

He then moved to Channel 4 in Detroit, which was then the Evening News Association station there before Post-Newsweek and ENA traded their Detroit and Washington outlets a few years back to avoid possible cross-ownership problems . . .

Sarginson then made the big move, to WSB in Atlanta, where he anchored probably the top-rated news show in that market for seven years . . .

Most recently he has been under contract to Westinghouse's Group W . . . (Washington viewers may remember his narration of a syndicated feature on Channel 9 about an Outward Bound-like executives trip down the Colorado River a year ago and he also reportedly does some in-flight narration for United Air Lines) . . .

John Long, vice president and director of sales for WJLA, said Friday that Sarginson has "worked very well with the focus groups" of area viewers assembled by the station to help sort out candidates for the job . . .

"He works very well with Renee, too," said Long.

"Wes told us he's sorry he ever left Washington," Long said Friday . . .

Sarginson is not moving into the happiest situation in the local TV market . . .

Seven's news room operation has apparently settled down a bit since news director Kris Ostrowski arrived last year from Cleveland . . .

But there is labor unrest. Seven's management is fighting the National Association of Broadcast Employees & Technicians (NABET), which won the right to represent some 15 news employes last year, and there are continuing rumors of employe morale problems . . . some of which of course are traceable to Seven's long failure to catch Channel 9 in the news races . . .

Seven is competitive at 11 o'clock despite ABC's failure in recent years to provide strong 10 p.m. programming lead-in strength . . .

But the station remains in a dogfight for second with Four in the early evening news and both consistently trail Nine, although there is some evidence (which Seven management promises to pursue) that the Nielsen ratings skew too favorably towards Nine's older audience and may be misrepresenting a closer race . . .

Regardless, among local broadcasters, Seven has a stodgy image that still remains to be addressed regardless of changes to anchor . . . before it will be seen as a consistent challenger for Nine . . . Meanwhile

Back at the Los Angeles TV writers' network press tour . . .

ABC executives are privately steaming over the probable success of Susan Harris' new sitcom, "The Golden Girls," which CBS is touting for the fall season . . .

ABC invested more than $5 million over the past few years in Harris' development projects, most of which didn't pan out. Her last, "Hail to the Chief," was so bad that ABC used it this past spring only because ABC had nothing else on the shelf at the moment . . .

When it came to "The Golden Girls," with a sure-fire cast like Bea Arthur and Betty White to boot, we hear Harris didn't even offer it to ABC and went straight to CBS with it . . .

In the matter of "Dynasty II: The Colbys of California," the word is that stars like Faye Dunaway, Charlton (Chuck) Heston and, yes, Elizabeth Taylor are bound to be series regulars next season . . . "Colbys" will debut after five episodes of "Dynasty" and a two-hour introductory pilot next fall, following the World Series . . .

ABC, bowing to pressure from affiliates, has ordered 33 episodes of "Dynasty" for next year . . .

That means no reruns during April in 1986 and a full slate of new shows during the May sweeps again.

It also means "Colbys" will probably do 28 shows . . . considerably more than the usual 22 a year . . .

Robert Wagner's new series -- he plays an international insurance investigator -- previously titled "Lloyds," "55 Lime Street" and "J.G. Culver," is now being called "Lime Street" . . .

R.J. and his crew will return to the Washington and Middleburg, Va., areas on July 16 to film the opening show of the fall season . . . it will air Saturdays at 9 on ABC . . .

If Captain Airwaves had to make a guess, it would be that the first Big NBC Series to take a fall next December will be . . . "Hill Street Blues" . . .

For all its awards and self-congratulations, "Hill Street" on Thursday night failed to hold the big audiences delivered by "The Cosby Show," "Family Ties," "Cheers" and "Night Court" and the affiliates don't need that when the local news rolls around at 11 p.m. . . .

We hear that former Washington Star editor Jim Bellows has been named managing editor of "ABC World News Tonight With Peter Jennings" . . .

The word came out of White Plains II, as ABC News President Roone Arledge assembled all of his executive producers for a couple of retreat days in the New York suburb (White Plains I, a retreat with his top executives a couple of months ago, having been such a success) . . .

Because of WPII, Arledge did not accompany Jennings, Ted Koppel and ABC News Vice President Av Westin to Los Angeles for a Saturday discussion of the upcoming three-hour "documentary" to be called "5/85," which will trace the major events in the world since the end of WWII (which is not to be confused with WPII) . . .

Nor, at the last minute, did Jennings come out, so busy was he with the breaking TWA hostages story over the weekend (Koppel's West Coast edition of "Nightline" on Friday night ended at 3 a.m. Washington time and he said yesterday he'd had an hour and a half of sleep since the broadcast before his afternoon appearance here . . .

Plans for "5/85" are just enough up in the air that neither Westin nor Koppel was questioned much about the program . . . although there's a chance a "Nightline" could follow if the telecast at 10:30 proves provacative enough . . .

On Friday, ABC Motion Picture President Brandon Stoddard had suggested that ABC News might go with a Koppel-hosted "Viewpoint" at the conclusion of an upcoming movie about capital punishment, to be called "The Execution of Raymond Graham" . . .

Although Koppel's "Nightline" did follow up on the Entertainment division's "The Day After" last year, the Newsies are generally chary about lending their authoritative airs to Entertainment shows and Saturday Koppel said he'd already told one ABC executive he didn't think much of the capital punishment follow-up idea . . .

While we're talking movies, ABC says that among its many upcoming projects are flicks to be called "Shattered Spirits" (Dad has a drinking problem); "The Office Party;" "The Celebration Family" (based on a real family that's adopted nearly 40 children); "The Defiant Ones" (a remake of the Tony Curtis-Sidney Poitier film); "The Further Adventures of the Ewoks"; and the previously announced "The Betty Ford Story," based on the former first lady's autobiography . . .

ABC Daytime may come up with a mini-series or two of its own to go with the regular soap operas . . . Stoddard called them "serials that will end" . . .

Captain Airwaves couldn't help noticing that for the first time in several seasons, ABC has no movies in the works that deal with strictly sexual themes (such as incest, homosexuality) that have previously managed to provoke controversy . . .

When he wondered aloud if the upcoming merger between the conservatively managed Capital Cities Communications Inc. and ABC Inc. (stockholders will vote on the merger June 25) had anything to do with their absence, Stoddard said, "Oh no. We don't try to be exploitative, ever. We do try to do a diversity of programming" . . .

Later, we asked Lew Erlicht, president of ABC Entertainment, about the lack of such shockers and he, too, claimed there was no connection with the upcoming merger . . .

"What we do are pro-social programs. I believe you can deal with any subject as long as it's tastefully done. It's not exploitative" . . .

Erlicht pointed out that ABC's "Diff'rent Strokes" has previously done two episodes on epilepsy and child abuse when on NBC and that his own "Webster" had dealt with child abuse earlier this year . . .

"Programs of this type, said Erlicht, "can help people" . . . And Finally

Bob Schieffer joins "CBS Morning News" today as a coanchor. He replaces B . . .

AIRWAVES! You promised!