The pressure is on a number of Washington celebrities who are accustomed to calling someone and getting tickets to whatever it is they want to see. The Washington wheelers-and-dealers are finding that it doesn't work that way with Bruce Springsteen rock concerts -- there are no tickets available. There are of course the private boxes at RFK. For the Jacksons' Victory Tour, Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke had a special party for a large group of his friends in his box. He isn't planning a similar party the night of the Springsteen concert. "That's not my kind of music," he said . . .

Actor Robert Wagner, in town filming for his upcoming television show "Lime Street," stopped by Dominique's restaurant Tuesday night for dinner. He was without reservations and the place was packed, but manager Diana Damewood managed to find him a good table . . . She didn't have that problem yesterday when Elizabeth Taylor showed up at 3 p.m. for a late lunch. She was there with her bodyguard. "She looked great," Damewood said, "and was thin as a rail." Taylor dined on salad, steamed mussels in white wine cream sauce and the restaurant's chocolate truffles named in her honor. She had nothing to drink and told Damewood she doesn't miss drinking at all . . .

Doing his part to protest "the atrocious racial policies" of South Africa, Woody Allen has signed a three-movie contract with Orion Pictures that bans the release of films in that country . . .

Alabama Gov. George Wallace underwent four hours of spinal surgery Wednesday to relieve chronic pain endured since he was shot by a would-be assassin 13 years ago, and an aide, quoting doctors, said there were no complications . . .

American-born master violinist Yehudi Menuhin yesterday finally accepted a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth first offered 20 years ago. He was able to be knighted now because this year he became a British citizen after living there more than 25 years. His condition for becoming a British citizen, he said, was being able to retain his American citizenship . . .

It's good to see a major American corporation admit it was wrong. Coca-Cola did that yesterday by delivering a case of old Coke, a k a "Classic Coke," to Guy Mullins, the Seattle man who headed the "Old Cola Drinkers of America" fight against Coca-Cola's new "improved" product . . .

It should help Disney's theme parks' business that three super entertainment figures -- Michael Jackson, George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola -- have finished a 12-minute, 3-D musical space fantasy to be used at Epcot Center, Disney World and Disneyland. If that kind of high-priced talent doesn't strengthen the appeal of the Disney parks, nothing will . . .