Channel 9's popular "Redskin Sidelines" live Monday night show has been sent to the 7:30 p.m. Saturday night Sidelines this fall -- on tape . . .

Nine, which is still tinkering with its fall schedule, has decided to strip the "Wheel of Fortune" game show -- one of the biggest syndicated shows in the country right now -- on Monday through Friday evenings at 7:30 come September and since the contract with the syndicators makes a five-night run mandatory, "Sidelines" had to go . . .

Sandra Butler, manager of broadcast operations for Nine, said yesterday that "we haven't restructured the whole show yet but right now it looks like we'll tape it before a live audience on Wednesday nights. The coach [Joe Gibbs] thinks the players can appear just as long as they get back to camp early" . . .

Butler thinks the new Saturday time slot is "in a healthy environment, with a good lead-in from 'Agronsky and Co.' "

"Sidelines," which Butler estimates has had an eight-year run at Nine, always benefited from live appearances by Redskins on Monday night when the players are full of fun, as it were, relaxing after a Sunday NFL contest . . .

Sources indicate that hosts Glenn Brenner and Sonny Jurgensen are both unhappy with the move -- since the immediacy of the live Monday show is gone -- which explains why the station is bending over backward to give them a choice of options on how to present the rescheduled show to its best advantage . . .

"Wheel of Fortune" will probably put more money in Nine's coffers but "Sidelines" enjoyed good ratings over the years and the experiment should prove interesting, especially to Channel 5, where Bernie Smilovitz's "Redskin Playbook" show on Monday nights should get a boost from the switch . . . Meanwhile

Over at Channel 7 yesterday, they announced the hiring of a new week night weatherman to replace Jim Ramsey, starting Sept. 9 . . .

He's Dave Sweeney, who has been something of a star at a Eugene, Ore., TV station for several years . . .

Seven president and general manager Tom Cookerly said Ramsey, whose contract was not renewed, "is looking into several offers and may get into radio ownership" . . .

Alan Eustis will continue as weekend weatherman and Fred Weiss will continue in the mornings . . .

Seven, meanwhile, revealed that it will not start a 5 p.m. week night news show this fall, as had been widely rumored . . .

Cookerly said yesterday he wants to get his revamped Front Four -- including Sweeney, sportscaster Frank Herzog, new anchor Wes Sarginson and holdover Renee Poussaint -- "a chance to get established" . . .

NBC News yesterday announced another management realignment in the wake of the departure of Tom Pettit, the executive vice president who returned to the correspondent ranks recently . . .

Pettit had been in charge of the network affiliate news feed, radio, "Meet the Press," children's news shows, documentaries, specials, and the election and polling unit . . .

Those jobs have been redistributed . . .

Executive vice president for news John Lane will get the specials; vice president for special production design Tom Wolzien picks up the affiliate news, documentaries and children's news . . .

Ray Lockhart, who has been vice president of worldwide news services, becomes a senior producer . . . Art Kent, currently vice president for news operations and satellites, gets radio and assumes some of Lockhart's duties . . .

Joe Angotti, recently returned from London where he had been general manager for Europe, becomes a vice president reporting to Lane and will head a personnel task force in charge of talent recruitment and assume some of Lockhart's duties . . .

Ed Planer, who has been assistant to Lane, will replace Angotti in London . . .

Tim Russert, who continues as vice president and assistant to NBC News president Larry Grossman, takes on responsibility for "Meet the Press" and the election and political polling unit . . . AID

The increased interest in coverage of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome story, following the disclosure that actor Rock Hudson is a victim, is beginning to pose a problem at some TV stations, where in at least two recent incidents news personnel balked at close contact with potential victims of the disease . . .

Yesterday at Channel 5 here a taping crew and a reporter were dispatched to the office of a local doctor who treats AIDS victims . . .

News director Betty Endicott said that after one interview with the doctor, plans were made to interview a second physician and one of his patients "when a member of the ENG crew, expressing fear of the disease, asked to be excused. A second crew, which had no such qualms, was dispatched in the first crew's place and the interview proceeded as planned" . . .

Endicott said they've received medical advice as to the dangers of the disease and have instructed employees regarding potential dangers . . .

"We always respect such requests," said Endicott. "If an employe doesn't want to go up in a helicopter, he or she doesn't have to go. It's always up to them" . . .

Meanwhile, in New York on Tuesday, an AIDS victim had agreed to come to the studios of Channel 11 (WPIX) for a live interview with anchor Morton Dean during the hour-long 10 p.m. local version of Independent Network News . . .

Bill Littauer, executive producer of the program, said yesterday that about 5:45 in the afternoon, he received a call from the station's chief engineer who reported that several technicians were expressing concern about the expected presence of the man in the studio . . .

After consultations with his staff, Littauer canceled the interview . . .

He said an additional report on the AIDS crisis was planned for last night's broadcast but it was not to be filmed in the studio . . .

A check with local and network TV executives yesterday revealed that while none could recall similar incidents in recent months, all had established policies -- on the books long before the AIDS virus was first discovered in 1980 -- giving employes who might come in contact with potentially life-threatening situations the option to refuse assignments . . .

Jim Van Messel, news director at Channel 4 here, said that the problem hasn't arisen at his station in recent months . . .

"We interviewed an AIDS patient several months ago but we had received medical advice that convinced us that the contact under the circumstances wasn't a problem" . . .

Penny Mickelbury, assistant news director at Seven, said yesterday that "the problem has not come up recently but we've done stories about AIDS victims without any problems in the past" . . .

A spokesman for Nine said "it hasn't been a problem here at all. We've done a number of such interviews and no one can recall any trouble with a crew" . . .

At ABC, NBC and CBS in New York, news executives could recall no incidents involving crews, in recent months, anyway . . .

Bob Murphy, ABC news vice president of news coverage, said that "as a matter of practice we never force anybody on the network to accept an assignment they consider dangerous. That would apply certainly to the AIDS question" . . . Also in the News

Jim Boyle, a press aide to Rep. Frank Wolf (R-Va.) and a former public affairs consultant with the Environmental Protection Agency, has been signed to be Washington publicist at the NBC News bureau here . . .

He starts Monday and will set right to work plugging the network's upcoming monthly "American Almanac," which debuts Tuesday at 10 p.m. . . .

Incidentally, NBC affiliates around the country will get a rare noontime look at the new magazine show today with live appearances by anchor Roger Mudd and executive producer Ed Fouhy . . .

NBC News, which has had terrible luck with its news magazine shows in the past, used to try and sneak the pilots by affiliates by sending them out sometime after midnight . . .