Washington's luxury-suite Bristol Hotel is rapidly establishing itself as the "in" spot for performing artists coming to the city. About 100 members of the Grand Kabuki cast and crew have been staying there; actor Jason Robards is in residence while performing in "The Iceman Cometh" at the American National Theater; 15 cast members from "Sing Mahalia Sing" at the Warner have checked in; and on Aug. 4, Olympic skater John Curry and 20 members of his cast from "The John Curry Skaters" will be there . . . . A few blocks away, the Watergate Hotel isn't doing too badly for stars in residence. Liberace and his piano were there last week, and Tom Jones is there this week. Johnny Mathis is expected to check in later in the week . . .

There is nothing better than old war stories among old soldiers unless it's old war stories told by old war correspondents. Members of the National Press Club are going to get their fill on Aug. 14, the 40th anniversary of V-J Day. At a luncheon that day, one of the most influential and powerful men in town, former defense secretary Clark Clifford, will recall his days as a naval aide at the White House in August 1945. In the evening, former press club president and NBC newsman Bryson Rash will cochair a program with Robert Sherrod, author of "Tarawa: The Story of a Battle," that will include Spencer Davis, former Pacific war correspondent for the Associated Press; Howard Handleman, who reported for International News Service; Max Desfor, AP photos; Joe Laitin, a war reporter who later worked in government, and Edgar Allen Poe of the New Orleans Times-Picayune . . .

It's tough being the Washington man. Sometimes the best thing that's said about him is that he's dull and obsessed with work. In an article on "The Washington Man" in the August issue of GQ magazine, Washington writer Karen Heller takes a few swings: "The Washington man has discovered feminism. This means he chooses the restaurant, dominates the conversation, corrects your English, questions your politics, ridicules your job, criticizes your friends, stares at other women but allows you the privilege of picking up half the check." . . .