Something Old

Lorna Luft, daughter of Judy Garland, joins the regular cast of CBS' "Trapper John, M.D." this fall, playing a nurse. She replaces Christopher Norris, who got tired of doing the series . . .

Katharine Ross will play Francesca Scott Colby, sister-in-law of Jason Colby (Charlton Heston) on ABC's "Dynasty II: The Colbys," which debuts in November after all the new characters are introduced on "Dynasty I" for something like eight weeks in a row . . .

Woody Harrelson, who had an understudy role in Broadway's "Biloxi Blues," will play the new bartender on NBC's "Cheers" this fall . . .

He'll show up on the opening episode looking for Coach (the late Nick Colasanto, who died of cancer last February). It seems he'd been taking a mail correspondence course in bartendering from Coach back home in Indiana . . .

And producers of NBC's "Night Court" have decided to dedicate the series' season opener to Selma Diamond (Selma Hacker on the show), who died of lung cancer this past spring . . .

At the conclusion of the episode, called "Hello, Goodbye," a photo of Diamond will be shown, with a voice-over tribute . . .

The same episode will also introduce Markie Post as attorney Christine Sullivan and Florence Halop as clerk Florence Kleiner, Miss Diamond's replacement . . . Something New

We hear that Channel 4 weekend coanchor Mike Hambrick, apparently disappointed that management won't move him to a weeknight anchor slot after some three years at the station, is looking around . . .

His departure from the NBC-owned station would complete an odd set of coincidences for the Hambrick family: In recent months brother John has left an anchor job at NBC-owned WNBC in New York and brother Judd has left an anchor job at NBC-owned WKYC in Cleveland . . .

A bill has been introduced in Congress that would require broadcasters to provide a minimum of seven hours per week of educational programming for children, at least five of which must air Monday through Friday . . .

"The Children's Television Education Act of 1985" would also require the FCC to conduct an inquiry into the implications of programs created to promote toys or other products popular with children -- the so-called "program-length commercials" . . .

The bill also sets an unusual nine-month deadline for the FCC to complete its inquiry . . .

Introducing the bill in the House, Rep. Timothy Wirth (D-Colo.), chairman of the House Telecommunications, Consumer Protection and Finance subcommittee, said that "this trend is growing so fast that, according to one estimate, as many as 20 Saturday morning programs this fall will feature this approach" . . .

Wirth wants the FCC to determine if such program lengths affect a "child's ability to tell the difference between programs and commercial contents and how the trend will affect the future of children's programming in general . . .

"When this type of programming is purchased by TV stations," Wirth told the House, "an arrangement is typically included which allows the broadcaster to share in the profits generated from the sales of toys and other related products." He expressed concern that the financial incentives "may override other factors that should be weighed in a broadcaster's decision regarding selection of children's program content" . . . and held the threat of license renewal denial over broadcasters should they fail to comply with the law, if passed . . .

Earlier unsuccessful legislation, bitterly opposed by broadcasters, had asked for only five hours of programming a week . . .

Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) introduced a similar bill in the Senate . . .

Wirth also introduced an authorization bill calling for funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting of $220 million in fiscal year 1988, $246 million in FY89 and $283 million for FY90 . . . and also authorizes funds for the Public Telecommunications Facilities Program of $24 million for each of fiscal years 1986, 1987 and 1988 . . .

"NBC Nightly News" commentator John Chancellor was flown to London by the British Broadcasting Corp. this weekend to appear on that network for the next several days as Great Britain braces for a one-day strike by both BBC and independent TV reporters on Wednesday to protest a cancellation of a program featuring a leading supporter of the outlawed Irish Republican Army . . .

The BBC board of governors canceled the program after strong protests from Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Home Secretary Leon Brittan . . .

Chancellor's criticism of the BBC board decision to knuckle under to the government ban on the Tuesday NBC commentary was used by the BBC later in the week . . .

Chancellor will satellite his nightly comments to the NBC show while in London . . . $/ Something Borrowed

Friday morning out in Hollywood, Daily Variety reported that longtime CBS News legal correspondent Fred Graham will be leaving the network at the end of the year because his request for a raise was denied . . . part of what Variety called a cost-cutting drive at CBS News ordered by top network management . . .

The trade paper's Kevin Goldman went on to say that "sources at CBS News said executives may use this episode to send the lean budget message throughout the division" . . .

Friday afternoon, Graham refused to comment on the Variety report, and his attorney, Bob Barnett, was not returning phone calls . . .

"It's something I can't talk about," said Graham . . .

We've been able to determine that there is a budget-cutting drive at CBS News but after that it gets a little murky . . .

Graham, who currently draws $250,000-plus annually, is up for a new contract but still has five months of negotiating time left. A source at CBS confirmed he may not have gotten the raise he asked for the first time around. He has also apparently told friends in the business he's thinking of leaving TV for other pursuits. He could retain a consultant's role with the network. . .

Graham, who has been covering the Supreme Court and the Justice Department, joined CBS News in 1972 after covering the court for The New York Times for seven years. He is a graduate of Vanderbilt University Law School . . .

Budget-cutting wise, CBS News reportedly canceled a trip to Japan by "Evening News" to mark the anniversary of the Hiroshima A-bomb because of budget cuts . . . which may explain why Dan Rather has gone on vacation this week, instead . . .

Goldman reported that the News division recently "gave back" $2 million to the network as part of its budget-cutting effort . . . a report CBS News denied on Friday . . .

Also at CBS, 55-year-old producer Russ Bensley has taken early retirement after 34 years with the network. He will raise Morgan horses on a farm outside Niles, Mich., which he calls Backgrounds Farm . . .

Friends toasted his farewell Friday in New York at Tavern on the Green . . .

Bensley, a former executive producer, was wounded in South Vietnam and most recently had been producing videocassettes about Vietnam for the network from CBS footage . . .