NBC won the prime-time summer rerun race for the 11th week in a row, averaging a 12 Nielsen rating and a 23 percent share of the audience, followed by CBS at 11/20 and ABC at 10.7/20 . . .

Of the 65 programs listed for the week ending Aug. 4, only three summer series and five specials were first-run on the three networks . . .

They included ABC's "Comedy Factory," which finished 36th, and ABC's "Rock 'n' Roll Summer Action," 46th . . .

CBS' "Royal Match," its "Love, Long Distance" and the "CBS Reports: Hiroshima -- 40 Years and Counting" all tied for 53rd place . . .

NBC's prime-time baseball game last week tied for 56th while the pregame special for that match finished 65th and last for the week . . . Also in the News

Channel 7, continuing to revamp its on-air news lineup, has signed Milwaukee anchor Dan Lewis, who will join Paul Berry Oct. 1 as coanchor of the 5:30 week-night news . . .

Lewis will also report on the 11 p.m. news. He is currently the 6 and 10 p.m. anchor at WISN, the ABC affiliate in Milwaukee. Seven years in that market, he has spent the last three at WISN . . .

He will replace Jim Dyer, whose contract has not been renewed . . .

A source in Milwaukee yesterday described the 35-year-old Lewis as a "younger, brown-haired Phil Donahue" . . .

Meanwhile, Channel 7 management confirms that the station is considering "several options" as it ponders whether to take a shot at putting a "Redskins Sidelines"-type show on the air Monday evenings this fall, now that Channel 9 has moved its own "Redskins Sidelines" to Saturday nights . . .

Rumors at rival broadcasteries (we just made that up, TV Column fans, so don't race for your Webster's) have it that Seven might even try a football show at 6:30 Mondays during the fall, preempting the last half-hour of the local newcast for the night . . . Oh, Oh!

It's August and those drums you hear beating in the morning heat are coming from Shirlington . . . where Channel 26 is warming up for still another fund-raising drive!!! . . .

It will run for 14 nights, starting Aug. 15, during which WETA hopes to raise $285,000 and add another 6,000-plus members . . .

No details on Special Guests, etc., yet, so you still have time to call your travel agents conscience-free . . .

At Channel 9, they've extended the contract of health reporter and sometime anchor Don Torrance for several more years . . .

And the papers have finally been signed adding another year to the current four-year contract of Nine weekend anchor and investigative reporter Bruce Johnson . . .

Still talking Public Broadcasting . . . Channel 13 in New York is taking an interesting gamble this fall that doesn't entirely please WETA here . . . even though the two stations are partners in the production of the "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" . . .

Starting Sept. 2, WNET will air the hour-long weeknight "NewsHour" starting at 7:30, leaving the 7 p.m. start time to the three commercial network news shows in the New York market . . .

About 25 stations around the country currently air "NewsHour" at other than the regular 7 p.m. start time . . .

The scheduling change, however, breaks up the traditional 8-to-9 p.m. PBS programming schedule for WNET, which will air five different half-hour programs during weeknights before moving to the PBS card at 9 p.m. . . .

As a result, the 8 p.m. Friday PBS regular, "Washington Week in Review," produced by WETA, has been dropped from the WNET schedule night and will show up, instead, at 9:30 a.m. Saturdays in New York, fighting the cartoons . . .

A spokesman for WNET said yesterday that "we tried to get WETA to send out 'Washington Week in Review' at 7 p.m. that night but they wouldn't go along with us" . . .

"Wall Street Week" will be in its regular 8:30 time slot on WNET on Fridays, as a result . . . and "Washington Week in Review" will lose a showcase half-hour in prime time in the biggest TV market in the country . . .

"Wonderworks" and "Mystery" are a couple of other 8 p.m. PBS staples that will move to weekend air dates on WNET because of the "NewsHour" change . . .

One more public broadcasting item, this also from WETA, which announces that Joan Frangos has been promoted from director to vice president, local development, and that Sue Ducat has been promoted from associate producer, "Washington Week in Review," to producer, news and public affairs, at the station . . . Hey, Gang!

Here's some more ratings news! . . .

A.C. Nielsen has announced that starting the week of Sept. 2, a single Nielsen point will represent 859,000 TV homes . . .

For the past year, a point was worth 849,000 homes, strongly suggesting that Nielsen now believes that an additional 1 million homes have joined the TV universe since 1984, for a total of 85.9 million nationwide . . .

Last week we ran an item about a local TV technician who wouldn't go out on an AIDS story for WTTG, and a revolt among personnel at Channel 11 in New York when it was learned an AIDS victim was to be interviewed live at the studio . . .

At the time, network officials said they couldn't recall any recent similar episodes but we've learned since that "CBS Sunday Morning" alone has had two such incidents this year . . .

Correspondent Bob Pierpoint recalls that three different CBS crews turned down an assignment to accompany him this spring to a New York hospital to interview an AIDS victim. As a result, CBS had to use an outside crew . . .

The incident upset Pierpoint, who thinks cameramen and others "are in the journalism business and have signed up for a profession that frequently has dangerous assignments. In this case, they weren't even in any danger -- it was at a hospital. I think these refusals could set a bad precedent" . . .

Lee Reichenthal, producer of the AIDS segment in question, said he wasn't upset about the turn-downs. "I think they're entitled to make a decision like that -- they have to live their lives. I'm not sure there were three crews involved, however. I do remember that I went out and did the story; it was no big deal but Bob's entitled to his opinion" . . .

An earlier AIDS story assignment on the CBS Sunday program was also turned down by at least one CBS News crew . . . And Finally

TV evangelist Pat Robertson is considering a bid for the Republican presidential nomination in 1988, an aide confirmed yesterday . . .

Robertson, 55, son of the late Sen. A. Willis Robertson (D-Va.), hosts "The 700 Club," a syndicated religious talk show that is a forum for his conservative Christian views . . .

Earl Weirich, public affairs director for Robertson's Christian Broadcast Network of Virginia Beach, said Robertson has been asked by several Republicans to consider running . . .

"He says he'll consider it -- pray about it and consider it -- although he hasn't done anything more than that," Weirich said. "He's got rather a businessman's head on him and a good background" . . .

Robertson recently switched from the Democratic to the Republican party, a move that may have fueled the speculation about a possible presidential campaign, Weirich said . . .

Virginia Republican chairman Donald Huffman said he discussed the campaign with Robertson last week . . .

"Pat is a wonderful guy, very personable, and just an outstanding man," said Huffman, who grew up two blocks from Robertson in Lexington. He added that the television evangelist could do much for the GOP . . .