Qualifications for archeological volunteers vary from program to program, although none calls for experience. Most have minimum age requirements. Because all offer some training by professionals, volunteers are expected to schedule a minimum number of hours, ranging from one afternoon to a weekend or weekly schedule.

*Alexandria Archeology: Old Town Alexandria offered the first municipally funded urban archeology program in the United States. Offices are in the Torpedo Factory, 105 N. Union St. Projects include 18th- and 19th-century land sites, wells and water excavation. Formal training program, minimum 9 hours per month commitment required. There is a waiting list. Joanna Moyar, (703) 838-4399.

*Harmony Hall: The 1723 Georgian manor house near Fort Washington, Md., will be the site of archeological field work by the National Park Service's National Capital Region Archeology Program beginning Sept. 9. In addition, early this winter and into spring, the Park Service will conduct archeological testing of a prehistoric (2000 B.C.) Indian site. Volunteers for both sites needed. Robert Sonderman, (301) 344-3385.

*National Park Service's National Capital Region Archeology Program: Located in Glenn Dale, Md., the Museum and Archeological Regional Storage Facility (MARS) is the repository for the program. Volunteers are accepted for identifying and cataloguing artifacts. Greg Vaughan or Robert Sonderman. (301) 344-3442.

*Archeology in Annapolis: Volunteers will be needed for several dig sites, such as this year's projects at Shiplap and Jonas Green's print shop, as well as at the laboratory in the Victualling Warehouse at 77 Main St. (301) 268-7770.

*Archeology for Amateurs: Program offered by Peter M. Kranz, a Washington paleontologist and environmental consultant, which takes small groups to fossil-hunting sites. (202) 547-3326 at ECOS Inc.

*Mount Clare: The 18th-century plantation of Charles Carroll, Barrister, on 112 acres in southwest Baltimore near Rte. I-95, is the site of continuing archeological work by the Baltimore Center for Urban Archeology. Currently, the center is restoring the mansion's original landscaping. Work will continue through late October. Minimum volunteer commitment is four hours. (301) 396-1866.

*King's Reach: A colonial tobacco plantation, circa 1680 to 1710, at the Jefferson Patterson Historical Park and Museum in St. Leonards, Md. Digs continue through Sept. 8. In spring, focus will shift to a prehistoric Indian excavation near the Patuxent River at the same site. Minimum requirement is one day. Dennis Pogue, (301) 586-0050.

*St. Mary's City: The 17th-century capital of Maryland ceased to exist as a city in 1710 when the capital was moved to Annapolis. Its open fields are now a state museum under excavation. The next volunteer program, starting in May, is a dig at the site of a 1660 Catholic chapel that Jesuits dismantled in 1705 when a law was passed preventing Catholics from worshiping in public. Volunteers are expected to provide "at least a couple of days, maybe a weekend." Henry Miller, (301) 862-9889.

*Maryland Heights: A tract of mountainous terrain just north of the Potomac River and directly opposite Harpers Ferry, W. Va. The site was occupied intermittently by Confederate and Union troops, until the battle of Antietam in nearby Sharpsburg when Union commander George B. McClellan ordered the construction at the heights of a stone fortress and military embattlements. The National Park Service starts excavations this fall. Volunteers are expected to work out a schedule of full days. Susan Frye, (304) 535-6371, ext. 6303.

*"Summer Field Schools List": A listing of summer excavations and expeditions in 35 states and more than a dozen foreign countries is available from the American Anthropological Association, 1703 New Hampshire Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009. Published in February, the list includes programs in prehistoric and historic archeology, resource management and archival research, among others. Those accepting volunteers are indicated. (202) 232-8800.