Don't Bother to Get Up, I'll Just Punch a Hole in the Side of the Ship file: "The A-Team" crew was on a seven-day cruise in Mexican waters along with 1,300 other passengers on the good ship Tropicale last week filming the two-hour season-opening episode of the NBC series . . .

UPI reports that when Mr. T and his bodyguards went to dinner last Wednesday night, Mr. T discovered his assigned table was already filled by technicians from the production unit, who not only refused to give up the table but proceeded to make fun of T and one of his bodyguards . . .

T reportedly demanded that "A-Team" executive producer Stephen J. Cannell make the intruders -- including the unit production manager, the wardrobe lady and sound and camera workers -- walk the plank on the spot . . .

When Cannell refused to fire them, T and his three bodyguards left the ship at Mazatla'n with three days of shooting left to go . . . ignoring Cannell's parting orders to be sure and be at work Monday morning in Hollywood . . .

Yesterday, a spokesman for NBC in Burbank said that "we've been told that Mr. T's representative has advised Stephen Cannell Productions that he is not feeling well and that we hope he will be able to to return to work soon" . . .

The UPI report said the mutiny occurred before shooting was finished and that they had to shoot around Mr. T after he left. But NBC said yesterday he was already finished with the shipboard shoot and, indeed, was not scheduled to work on Monday, either . . .

A spokesman for Stephen Cannell Productions said late yesterday that Mr. T had, indeed, been ill and was expected back at work this morning . . .

Charlotte Clay said she could not confirm the UPI story, however. "I've heard 100 different versions and my response is that if you've ever met Mr. T the chances are you wouldn't be insulting him" . . . Be Still, My Heart

Kate Jackson and the gang from CBS' "Scarecrow and Mrs. King" will be in Washington in late October to film at least one episode and update some location shots . . .

The long-running "Today" show's journey into Monday night -- for the announced purpose of maybe hustling some new morning customers from the prime-time audience -- got a 9.4 rating and a 16 percent audience in the 10 big cities metered by Nielsen . . .

That doesn't sound like much when we're talking "Cosby Show" numbers, maybe, but NBC estimates that when the nationals are in (and all the rural votes are counted) "Today -- At Night" will have been seen by about 19 million viewers, compared with an average 7 million who watch the show during the morning over a year . . .

As a result, NBC News officials are already making plans to try the experiment again, probably after "American Almanac" goes weekly in January . . .

One executive pointed out yesterday that "if just 1 percent of Monday night's audience comes back to the morning version, it will be worth it, and gets us that much closer to (ABC's) 'Good Morning America' " . . .

In Washington, the 33-year-old program, in making its first prime-time appearance ever, did a 10.7/19 . . .

The only reason ABC Sports finally pressured Indianapolis Speedway for live coverage of the Indy 500 starting next May 25 was the fact that fewer and fewer were bothering to watch the race on tape in prime time on Sunday, hours after it had ended . . .

This year's Sunday telecast in prime time was seen in about 8.2 million TV homes, down from 10.8 million the year before and 11.6 million in 1983 -- a drop of 31 percent in just two years . . .

Meanwhile, the show dropped from 23rd place in the weekly rankings last year to 43rd in 1985 . . .

Next year, the 4 1/2-hour coverage will start at 11 a.m., with the race beginning at noon . . .

For himself, Airwaves is going to miss the uncanny prescience of the ABC announcers as the taped race unraveled on those long Sunday evenings . . .

As we mentioned back in June (surely, you remember?) Tom Brokaw will be anchoring "NBC Nightly News" from a new set in the NBC newsroom, starting in mid-September . . .

The network had long been considering the switch but the effectiveness of newsroom telecasts by both Brokaw and Roger Mudd during this summer's hostage crisis and President Reagan's bout with cancer convinced executives they were on to a good thing . . .

The current set is on the third floor at 30 Rockefeller Plaza while the news-gathering facilities are on the fifth. Which means wire stories, etc. have to be hustled downstairs on the elevator, instead of just 20 feet to the location of the new set . . .

Introduction of the newsroom set will coincide with the introduction on "Nightly News" of the new musical theme written by composer/conductor John Williams . . . and a revamping of the format that will permit Brokaw to do more interviews . . .

And just by coincidence, TV Column fans, we happen to have last week's network news ratings in front of us even as we compose The Daily Miracle . . . so let us announce without further delay that:

"CBS Evening News Without Dan Rather" won the weekly network ratings race with an 11.6 Nielsen rating and a 25 percent audience share, followed by "ABC News Without Peter Jennings," at 9.1/19, which edged "NBC News With Tom Brokaw" at 9.0/19 (Dan and Peter were vacationing, of course) . . .

That's 53 straight weeks in a row for CBS, since ABC stopped airing the Summer Olympics last August . . . Also in the News

A survey by C-SPAN, which already telecasts proceedings from the House of Representatives, indicates that nearly two-thirds of the 100-member Senate support televising that chamber's proceedings . . .

The survey showed 62 senators indicating support for some form of Senate coverage, while 18 said they would not support the plan in any form, 15 were leaning against support for such action and five did not take a position . . .

The Senate Rules Committee has set a hearing for Sept. 17 to consider measures that would allow TV in the Senate . . .

The House began televising its proceedings in 1979 and the nonprofit Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network says House coverage is now available in 21.5 million cable TV homes around the country . . .

Filibusters in 1982 and 1984 have blocked legislation to begin televising of Senate sessions and the effort lost a major supporter when former Senate majority leader Howard Baker (R-Tenn.) retired . . . Oops!

A little gremlin snuck into the TV Column Computer yesterday. As a result, in reporting that Channel 9 was revising its morning schedule this fall, Captain Airwaves blithely moved "The Carol Randolph Show" and "Sally Jesse Raphael" into the 9-to-10-a.m. time slot, when of course he meant 10-to-11-a.m., leaving "Donahue" right where he belongs, at 9 a.m. this fall . . .

It may have been the same gremlin who traveled to ABC Entertainment in New York last week and, disguising its voice to sound like a PR person, called Captain Airwaves to report that "Good Morning America" had already visited the Ohio State Fair in Dayton and was planning to visit the Minnesota State Fair in Minneapolis . . .

An awful lot of Ohioans and Minnesotans called a puzzled Airwaves to point out that their fairs are held in Columbus and St. Paul, respectively. He regrets the errors . . .

(The same gremlin, who seems to thrive in this hot weather, also induced Airwaves to incorrectly remove "Hunter" from this fall's Saturday night schedule. We need not repeat, in a family column, what NBC had to say about that) . . .