Time Inc. will begin test sales today of its new Picture Week magazine in 13 cities that won't include Washington but will include Baltimore. The magazine will carry black-and-white photographs and human interest stories that are said to resemble those of People magazine, which Time Inc. also owns. The inaugural edition contains the first in-depth interview Jane Smith has given since her 13-year-old daughter Samantha died last month in a plane crash. She said she plans to create a foundation in memory of her daughter, who went on a peace mission to the Soviet Union at the invitation of Soviet leader Yuri Andropov. Smith died returning home from London, where she had been filming for her part in the new ABC television series "Lime Street." The first episode of the show ran Saturday and was dedicated to Samantha . . .

Washington's theater community gathered last night to honor one of its own. At the Arts Club of Washington a group including actors Raul Julia and Karen Akers assembled to toast Bonnie Nelson Schwartz, producer, casting consultant and founder of the Helen Hayes Awards, which recognizes the efforts of Washington's professional theaters. A special surprise: the award's namesake, Helen Hayes, was present at the evening, which was presented by Horizons Theatre . . .

Helga Orfila, who owns an "ultimate accessories" boutique, hosted a fashion show yesterday for German fur designer Rolf Schulte at Boccaccio's Restaurant. Among those expected was Kevin Boyce, the "perfect woman's size 6" man who models women's fashions in New York. He was there in a basic black dress. Invited for the showing of minks, some dyed red, were the mayor's wife, Effi Barry; former national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski and his wife Emilie; Madison Hotel owner Marshall Coyne, who will be 75 Friday; former ambassador True Davis; television producer Nancy Dickerson and presidential counselor Fred Fielding . . .

Wealthy fashion designer Laura Ashley, who lived her life in France and Brussels, a tax exile from Great Britain, came home to be buried. She was buried Saturday in her native Wales, in the countryside that inspired her style . . .

It's one of those stories that's hard to believe. Two months ago a British couple, Mark and Sandra Kerry, were married but they didn't have a pictorial record of the event since their wedding photographs were lost in the mail. Apparently they felt that without photographs there was no reality, so they restaged the wedding Saturday, complete with a replica of the bridal bouquet and the original 200 relatives and friends and the vicar . . .