Who you gonna call? If you're Ivan Reitman, whose last film was the monster hit "Ghostbusters," you can call anybody you want to cast your next movie. The romantic comedy, which has the working title "Legal Eagles," has quite a cast: Robert Redford, Debra Winger and Daryl Hannah. Filming is expected to begin in less than a month in Los Angeles and New York City. The film, which is due out next summer, is set in New York's art and legal circles, and the director has compared it to a sophisticated comedy from the 1940s. Reitman will save some money by not springing for "Ghostbusters"-style special effects, but, he acknowledges, much of the savings will be spent paying the hefty salaries of the movie's three stars . . .

The Jeff Bridges/Glenn Close suspense drama "Jagged Edge" got off to a good start last weekend, making $4.1 million while Close's other current release -- "Maxie" -- did a quick fade. "Jagged Edge" is also notable as probably the first murder mystery in which the murder weapon is a former trademark of the guy who wrote the movie: Joe Eszterhas, back in the days when he wrote magazine articles for Rolling Stone and the like, was well-known for carrying a six-inch hunting knife in his briefcase, and that knife has a jagged edge . . .

Early this week, Paramount screened Stephen King's "Silver Bullet" for an industry crowd, but there was no surprised gasp when the identity of the marauding werewolf was revealed. Of course, that may be because the credit sheet distributed at the door listed one actor twice -- once near the beginning of the cast list under a character name, and then again at the end as "werewolf." Good thing they don't pass out credit sheets to regular crowds . . .

He's already defeated Apollo Creed, Mr. T and most of North Vietnam, and it's getting harder and harder to find a worthy opponent for Sylvester Stallone in his various incarnations. (Sorry, "Rocky vs. Rambo" is out of the question.) But Cannon Films is trying hard to come up with a fearsome foe for Stallone in "Over the Top," a $12 million film due out next summer in which Sly plays a trucker/arm wrestler.

As an arm-wrestling opponent for Stallone, Cannon has signed one Cleve Dean, a 475-pound pig farmer from Payo, Ga. Cleve is no ordinary pig farmer: Folks in Payo say he trains by lifting the rear end of his pickup truck, and they tell of the time he carried a cow across the road because it was in his way. Cannon promises to advertise "Over the Top" -- and the national arm-wrestling contests that they've been using to find costars -- at "every truck stop in America"; they've also recruited Budweiser to build a national ad campaign around the making of the movie. "Blue-Collar America," promised a Cannon executive vice president, "will be waiting for this movie . . ."

Some of those same folks probably filled the theaters last weekend when Arnold Schwarzenegger's "Commando" topped the box-office charts with $7.7 million, the biggest fall opening of the past several years. No word, though, on whether the "Commando" line of clothing -- it, too, was released last weekend -- did similar bang-up business. (Clothing stores, after all, don't report their totals quite as readily as movie theaters.) Still, the line of military and camouflage-style clothing got quite a reaction from the Hollywood Reporter, which noted -- in what was ostensibly a straightforward news story -- that the line hit the stores "nearly a month prior to Halloween," and concluded with a terse, "Maria Shriver could not be reached for comment."