California and Florida have long argued about which produced the best orange juice, and now they've got something else to fight about. Buoyed by the success of "Miami Vice" and by the $200 million worth of movies that were filmed in the state last year, the Florida Motion Picture and TV Bureau has predicted that by the year 2000, the state will supplant Hollywood as the center of the motion picture industry.

"Hollywood is not going to die," admits Gov. Bob Graham, who reiterated the bureau's prediction during a recent trip to Los Angeles. Film production in Hollywood, he said, will remain at its current level; in Florida, he predicted, it'll grow enormously. To help it along, Graham was in town announcing the winners of the first Governor's Screenwriting Competition, which saluted writers whose screenplays are set in Florida, and thus likely to be filmed in the state. (Ernest Hemingway's niece Hilary Hemingway was one of the winners.)

Florida currently trails both California and New York as film centers, and Miami's Limelight Studios is its only complete production and sound stage complex. And though the state hosted 35 movies last year and 20 so far this year, 90 percent were produced by film companies based in Hollywood. For now, orange juice sounds like a better argument . . .

For everybody who eagerly followed Hollywood's nationwide search for youngsters to play the leads in "Annie" and "Return to Oz," another such talent search will soon be under way. This time, the newly formed Longstocking Productions is looking for a 10- or 11-year-old girl to play the title role in, naturally, "The New Adventures of Pippi Longstocking," a film based on Astrid Lindgren's children's stories. The casting search -- which starts Oct. 28 in Chicago and continues in five cities over the following month -- will be headed by Garrison True, who spearheaded the search for "Annie." The film's screenplay is being written by Ken Annakin, who wrote "The Longest Day" and "Battle of the Bulge" and also directed Disney's "Swiss Family Robinson" and "Robin Hood" . . .

Producers Jack Schwartzman and Sidney Kimmel, ready to start work on their science fiction film "Star Is My Destination," say they are considering an intriguing offer from a prospective coproducer, according to Daily Variety. The party that wants in on the antinuclear film is the Soviet Union, which Schwartzman says wants to handle the special effects on the space saga, set in the year 2400. To prove they're as good as, say, Industrial Light and Magic, the Russians duplicated the special effects in "Superman" and "E.T." They've also offered to foot a hefty portion of the bill . . .

"In 1905, he discovered relativity. In 1906, he invented rock 'n' roll." He's Albert Einstein, in case you're wondering -- at least, that's the premise behind the film "Young Einstein," whose makers recently took out Hollywood trade ads to promote their unusual concept of the physicist. The movie, it says here, is "The Story of Music. Of Science. Of Lust, Greed, Passion, Lost Innocence and Genius. Of the Big Beat and one kid's quest for relevance in the wake of international scandal." And if that doesn't sound like the Einstein we learned about in school, it's about what you'd expect from a film whose lead character is played by an actor named Yahoo Serious. Yahoo also directed, coproduced and cowrote the movie, though a fine-print notice says that's not the name he used to sign his contract . . .

His "Terms of Endearment" was a big hit and he sold his novel "Lonesome Dove" to the movies for lots of money; now, Larry McMurtry will write the screenplay for "Honkytonk Sue," which is to star Goldie Hawn and be directed by Peter Bogdanovich . . . Steven Spielberg's "Amazing Stories" hasn't been faring too well with TV critics or audiences, and now another of his many productions has run into trouble. Last week Universal told its exhibitors that "The Money Pit," a Spielberg production directed by Richard Benjamin, was being pulled from its planned Dec. 13 release date. "It needed more work," said a Universal VP, while the official word from Spielberg's Amblin Productions is that moving the release from Christmas to Easter gives the company time to run some test screenings, something that wouldn't have been possible if "The Money Pit" had to be out in December.