The DeLorean divorce and child custody battle is getting meaner and meaner. A tearful Cristina Ferrare Thomopoulos testified yesterday that "John and I could never agree on anything, but because of the events of the last couple of weeks, I realize now it's in the best interest of my children that I have sole custody." It was her first time testifying in the divorce trial in Somerville, N.J.

John DeLorean said he was shocked by that demand and a request for $6,000-a-month support for the two children. His attorney charged that Thomopoulos and her new husband, Anthony Thomopoulos, "are motivated by greed." One of Thomopoulos' attorneys said DeLorean was trying to get sympathy Monday when he checked himself into the hospital with heart palpitations he blamed on Thomopoulos. "DeLorean is up to his old tricks," he said. "I don't believe it for a minute, but if anyone does, I have a bridge in Brooklyn I'd like to sell them." Honoring the Girl Scouts

First Lady Nancy Reagan, the honorary chairman of Girl Scouts U.S.A., yesterday received an honorary Girl Scout patch initiating an educational campaign to combat drug abuse among young people. And to think, she pointed out, how surprised her parents would be since "I never made it past Brownies." The $10,000-per-table luncheon at the Ritz-Carlton raised $200,000 for the campaign. Among the guests at the dinner were Baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth, the Duke and Duchess of Marlborough and Lady Romsey, who are here for the opening of the "Treasure Houses of Britain" exhibition, cosmetics mogul Este'e Lauder, Washington's first lady Effi Barry, columnist Ann Landers and Frances Hesselbein, executive director of the Girl Scouts. End Notes

Woody Allen's "The Purple Rose of Cairo" was due to open in Johannesburg in a few weeks, but it won't be opening there after all. Stern Kinekor, the nation's largest theater chain, said it would honor Allen's request that his movies not be shown in South Africa. Allen said he did not want them shown there as his expression of opposition to the white-ruled government's policies of apartheid . . .

Former U.N. ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick was to receive the prestigious Jabotinsky Prize in New York City last night "for her exceptional service in defense of the rights of the Jewish people." She shared the $100,000 prize with "Operation Moses," the rescue mission that successfully brought 10,000 Ethiopian Jews into Israel. Kirkpatrick was cited specifically for her defense of Israel and the Jewish people at the United Nations "in the face of continuing hostility and harassment" . . .

Syndicated columnist Joseph Kraft, who will continue writing his column, has joined the Brookings Institution as a guest scholar. He will be researching a forthcoming book on investment banking and the restructuring of the American economy to be published by Simon and Schuster . . .

Former White House social secretary Gahl Hodges is having her adjustment problems. She is now living in Bonn with her husband Richard Burt, the U.S. ambassador there. In a phone call to her one-time White House colleague Sheila Tate, she said she misses the news from Washington, which she gets three days late. She also said she's working on her German by watching "Sesame Street" in the mornings and has already learned her numbers . . .

Royal Watch: nine days and counting. Or the news media gets its revenge for the splashing with cold water. Charles and Diana went to an Australian wildlife hideaway yesterday hoping to see some emus and kangaroos. All they saw were some tracks. The press corps, briefly allowed on the island to watch the Samsonite Couple arrive by launch, apparently frightened the animals into the bush. Charles and Diana were then treated to a barbecue and the media had a barbecue too, on an island a few miles away . . . And Diana showed up in the evening at a charity ball wearing an emerald and diamond necklace, a wedding gift from her mother-in-law, the queen, as a headband. That should make Fleet Street headlines for weeks . . .