Royal Watch: Four days and counting. There is the serious side to this royal visit and the amazing magnetism Princess Diana seems to have with young people. The morning Diana arrives at Andrews Air Force Base with Prince Charles, who happens to be traveling with her, she will meet 16-year-old Jonathan Lollar from Ocean Springs, Miss. Lollar, who is blind and suffering from a life-threatening brain tumor, said he wanted to meet the princess of Wales, and the Make a Wish Foundation, which grants wishes to terminally ill children, arranged it through the British Embassy.

When Diana has her tour of the Washington Home and Hospice later in the afternoon, she will have the opportunity to meet some former British subjects. Among them are Mary Scott, 98, who was a designer of British aircraft, and Letitia Whitty, 95, who said she once stayed up all night to see Queen Victoria. When Whitty was asked what she thought about Diana's visit or what she might say to her, she said: "I don't really care about the visit. If I want to talk to her I will, and if I don't, I won't." Brotman's 'Damn Yankees' Reprise

Show business beckons Charlie Brotman again. One of the city's better known sports personalities, Brotman received a telephone call from the Potomac Playmakers in Hagerstown, who are producing the musical "Damn Yankees." They had learned that Brotman was the Griffith Stadium voice of the real Washington Senators and wanted to know if he would be the voice in their play, which opens Saturday at the Women's Club in Hagerstown.

What they didn't know was that Brotman was not only the Griffith announcer for nearly 10 years, but also the stadium announcer in the movie version of "Damn Yankees." Brotman won't be standing on some Washington street corner Saturday night trying to catch sight of the British royals; he'll be in Hagerstown reliving happier days at Griffith Stadium. End Notes

John F. Kennedy Jr.'s car was towed away while he was attending Monday's dedication of a living memorial -- a park on Boston's Charles River -- to his father. Cambridge police took the car because it was illegally parked, and Kennedy had to write a check to a friend to get the $40 cash needed to get it back. The dedication was also attended by Sen. Edward Kennedy, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Caroline Kennedy . . .

Next-day item on former Beatle Paul McCartney and his calling the late John Lennon a "maneuvering swine" who took credit for songs he did not write: Fearing his four-year-old comment quoted in an article in Britain's Woman Magazine might be misunderstood, McCartney said yesterday, "In case this latest report has led to any misconception in people's minds, I'd like to make it clear that John Lennon was no angel, but I, like millions of others, loved him dearly."

Media note: Charles Wilson, deputy editor of the London Times, was named editor of the newspaper yesterday. He succeeds Charles Douglas-Home, who died of cancer last week. A 50-year-old Scot, Wilson started his career as a copy boy. He edited the Chicago Sun-Times for three months last year after it was taken over by Australian publishing magnate Rupert Murdoch . . .

Actor Robert Redford is expected to attend tomorrow's open house for the new Washington headquarters of Island Press, a nonprofit publisher dedicated to conservation and environmental management. The important question here, since the White House is so carefully guarding its guest list for Saturday's private dinner for Charles and Diana, is does that mean Redford is in town for that dinner also? He's one of the stars Diana requested . . .

And one last Watch note today: Out at J.C. Penney at Springfield Mall they were trying, of all things, to balance a Rolls-Royce atop Wedgwood cups. As might be expected, the cups broke. But undaunted store officials are confident the car will be on the cups in time for the royal visit Monday . . .