Raspy voiced singer-songwriter Tom Waits is expanding his career by leaps and bounds. Having just released a new album, "Rain Dogs," he's putting the finishing touches on a play, "Frank's Wild Life," to be produced in December by Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre. The play, based on a song from "Swordfishtrombone," is being described as a cross between "Eraserhead" and "It's a Wonderful Life."

After that, Waits will star in two films, Jim Jarmusch's "Down by Law" and Robert Frank's "There Ain't No Candy Mountain." Waits, who's married to scriptwriter Kathleen Brennan, also has done work for her boss, Francis Coppola. He appeared in "The Outsiders," "Rumble Fish" and "The Cotton Club," and wrote the fabulous songs for "One From the Heart." Sending a Message

Jane Wiedlin, who recently embarked on a solo career after leaving the Go-Go's (the group, not the Sound of Washington), has packed two post cards inside her first album. The cards are addressed to President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev -- at their home addresses to boot -- and urge them to "stop all nuclear testing immediately" and pursue alternatives to the nuclear arms race during their meetings in Geneva. Stamps are not included. Just a Little Joke

Dee Snider, Twisted Sister's lead singer and one of the main reasons the Senate Commerce Committee hearings on "leerics" outdrew the Watergate hearings, has had two of his front teeth capped with fangs (they'll be that way for at least a year). He's made yet another point on the group's new album, "Come Out and Play." The cover will be stickered with a big (and self-inflicted) consumer warning "H" and the following descriptive phrase: "May contain words and phrases that require a sense of humor. If you lack this prerequisite, do not listen to this album." Odds and Sods

AC/DC, the band the Parents Music Resource Center loves to hate, performs at the Convention Center Tuesday. On an earlier stop on its American tour, band members met Stephen King, who is not only the master of the horror genre but a fan of heavy metal rock. Connections were made, and now AC/DC will score King's directorial debut, "Maximum Drive" (about a passing comet that turns anything under its path made of metal into a man-eater) . . .

Creem, the monthly rock magazine that suspended publication last summer after 17 years, will resume its caustic appraisals of hard rock and heavy metal next month (with an issue dated February 1986). Although low in circulation -- somewhere over 100,000 -- Creem has a loyal following as the most British (i.e., irreverent) of America's music journals . . .

"Cut the Crap," the Clash's first album in three years, hits the stores this week, while "Big Audio Dynamite," featuring the group's former guitarist Mick Jones, is already in circulation. Singing and playing keyboards in BAD is Don Letts, who spent the summer in Washington codirecting the Washington go-go film, "Good to Go" . . .

Paul McCartney has left Columbia Records, where he signed a highly publicized multimillion-dollar deal in 1979 (for American releases only), and quietly returned to Capitol, home of the Beatles, Wings and first solo projects. In five years at CBS, McCartney never delivered the megasales, producing only one No. 1 album, "Tug of War." The first Capitol album, which will include his theme song for John Landis' "Spies Like Us," should be out in February. There may be some new John Lennon material on Capitol as well, the result of the label's signing Yoko Ono. Due out early next year: "One on One," chronicling Lennon's Madison Square Garden concert in 1971 . . .

And now Hell Aid. Last night, New York's Limelight club (housed in a former church) hosted a benefit for the Hells Angels Defense Fund, which seeks to help several dozen bikers busted under the controversial RICO law (Racketeering-Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act). Performing were Joe Walsh, Johnny Paycheck, Molly Hatchett and three former Washington area stars, Robert Gordon, Jorma Kaukonen and Joan Jett. The evening kicked off with a motorcycle procession and ended with a raffled Harley-Davidson. There was also a photo exhibit of the Angels life style. No one is yet talking about a record, book or video.