Rep. Lynn Martin has her own tongue-in-cheek response to White House chief of staff Donald Regan's comments about how "most women" would rather read about the human interest stuff than the substantive issues at Geneva. As the world knows by now, his was one of the most talked about statements during that big photo opportunity known as the summit. In a Washington Post story about the first lady's Geneva preparations, he said that women were not going to understand "throw-weights" or what is "happening in Afghanistan or in human rights." But then, who does?

Yesterday, on the floor of the House, Martin said that men she had lunched with Tuesday were not talking about the summit -- they were talking about Joe Theismann's broken leg. "From this, I have determined that males read sports pages and know very little about what happens -- or care -- in Geneva," she said. The Home Before the Senate

It's tough being the child or spouse of a congressman who often isn't around when he or she should be. Corinne Quayle, the 6-year-old daughter of Sen. Dan Quayle, needed to have her father around last night, so she thought she would appeal to her father's boss. She sent a handwritten note to Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole that read: "I have my 2nd grade play tonight. Please make sure there aren't any votes between 7 and 9 p.m. so my daddy can watch me. Please come with him if you can."

Dole would not be able to attend because he had a busy night ahead of him in first attending a roast for Sen. Jesse Helms and then being at President Reagan's speech before a joint session of Congress. Quayle, an unusual Capitol Hill father, said he would see his daughter play the witch in the Spring Hill Elementary School play in Fairfax County, and if it was over in time would try to make the president's speech.

Speaking of the speech, veteran Capitol Hill observers said they couldn't remember a previous time when a president helicoptered dramatically to the East Plaza of the Capitol to address a joint session of Congress. But as one said, "Why not? It was the public relations finale to a public relations summit." End Notes

For those who found it interesting that Classic Coke is a more effective contraceptive than the unsavory concoction known as New Coke -- there's more. Tracey Stephens, the spokesman for the Planned Parenthood Association, blasted the report from Harvard Medical School doctors who ran an experiment, half in jest, and then wrote of their findings in a letter to the highly respected New England Journal of Medicine. Stephens warned that in using Coke for such a purpose: "It is ineffective and more importantly it can be fatal" . . .

When Georgetown University President Timothy S. Healy learned that the Georgetown School of Foreign Service was considering using the prestigious Cosmos Club for its annual Diplomatic Ball, he vetoed the idea. The Cosmos Club does not permit women members and such discriminatory policies are against university policies. Father Healy, however, is a member of the Cosmos Club himself, but reportedly has been fighting on the inside to eliminate the ban against women members. . .

One more Geneva summit item: Will Mikhail Gorbachev be Time magazine's upcoming Man of the Year? United Press International is reporting that Time photographer Rudi Frey was spotted taking photographs of the Soviet leader while other photographers were taking photographs of Frey taking the photographs. One of those men reportedly identified himself as being part of the Man of the Year promotion team that handles the highly publicized New Year edition cover. There have been stranger and far less logical Man of the Year covers . . .