Anne M. Burford, the feisty, embattled former administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has her "getting even" book in the bookstores. Titled "Are You Tough Enough?" and written with prolific Washington writer John Greenya, Burford is clearly out to settle some old scores. And one of her former colleagues in the Reagan administration she remembers with considerable distaste is David Stockman, then director of the Office of Management and Budget.

She said he exercised an "unwholesome degree of power over EPA," and while she felt he was "one of the most brilliant young men I have ever met," she said Stockman was also "one of the most driven and calculating. And when he gets fixed on an idea, he does not easily let it go. It is a matter of record that he hates the legislation that established the Environmental Protection Agency. In fact, he hates EPA. Period." Maybe Stockman will have equally nice things to say about Burford when his book comes out next year.

And as for Rita Lavelle, the former EPA official who was convicted of perjury and was released from prison in September, Burford said she was forced to hire her by the White House. "When I first saw Rita Lavelle," she wrote, "I was not favorably impressed . . . The woman does not make a favorable physical impression. She is overweight, an unnatural blonde, and her appearance is blowsy . . . At the time I didn't think she was as dumb as she turned out to be . . ." It has been said that Burford is tough enough to kick the belly out of a full-grown alligator. Mitch Snyder's Creche

Mitch Snyder, that zealot for the hungry and homeless, may have just come up with an idea that will make a number of people uncomfortable this Christmas season. If he gets his way, and it's doubtful he will, he wants a special statue he has commissioned to be included at the Christmas Pageant of Peace on the White House Ellipse. He is to announce through his Committee for Creative Non-Violence at a press conference today that the life-size statue will be figures of a black man, woman and child huddled over a steam grate. It will have the inscription "And still there is no room at the inn."

The statue, created by James Earl Reid of Baltimore, will be funded by the sale of donated works of 100 artists, including cartoonist Garry Trudeau, Washington painter Sam Gilliam and sculptor Claes Oldenburg. The fund-raising sale will be Dec. 8 at the Addison Gallery and Snyder plans to unveil the work Dec. 12. Snyder describes the work as a "contemporary Nativity scene" that he is anticipating the government will oppose. Snyder says, however, he will sue the government to have this work included in the "Pageant of Peace." End Notes

American novelist Joseph Heller and South African J.M. Coetzee were honored yesterday as the best foreign novelists of the year by France's Interrallie book awards. Heller won for his most recent novel, "God Knows," and Coetzee for "Michael K., His Life, His Time" . . .

Bob Strickland, the WDVM-TV "Eyewitness News Nightcast" reporter, won the Capital Press Club's Washington Media Award at last weekend's "Salute to Excellence" dinner at the J.W. Marriott Hotel . . .

Seven Washingtonians will be honored for their volunteer work at tonight's 12th annual Thanksgiving Tuesday Awards at Catholic University's Hartke Theatre. Those receiving the awards, given by Catholic University and Madison National Bank, are Thomas Baker, president of Special Love Inc. and Planned Developments; Greg Gannon, director of the Higher Achievement Program; Suzanne Goldman, developer of the Trinity Players' Children's Theatre Program; Marvin Goldman, president of K-B Theatres; Lucille I. Green, director of the Cardozo High School Infant Center; Eleanor Merrill, publisher, and Philip Merrill, chairman of The Washingtonian magazine. The Redskins' Mark Moseley, a previous winner, will be the guest speaker . . .

Christopher Kraft, NASA's former flight director and a 1945 graduate of Virginia Tech, is turning over to his alma mater a collection of papers that spans 37 years of space research . . .