For all those people who are waiting to read David Stockman's account of life inside the Reagan administration: You may get that and a lot more, too. With his deadline looming at the end of next month, Stockman has produced 1,000 pages of typed manuscript, with another 300 expected. And according to one who has read the manuscript, Stockman spends the first 350 pages just getting to the point where he decides to run for Congress.

The book promises to be a probing account of the personal history and intellectual development and disillusionments of Stockman. Or, as one close associate of Stockman said, "It's his vision of how the world should work." Stockman's opus apparently will finish the story that writer William Greider began in the famous 1981 Atlantic magazine article "The Education of David Stockman." He will take the reader through his boyhood in Michigan and his studies at Harvard University Divinity School, his years with former Republican congressman John Anderson, his philosophical shift to neoconservatism and his appointment as Office of Management and Budget director in the Reagan administration to his resignation earlier this year.

One personal acquaintance said the finished book will be tough and searching and filled with the kind of self-criticism familiar to those who know Stockman as a serious man. The finished book is expected to be 350 to 400 pages (it usually takes 2 1/2 pages of typed manuscript to make one page in a book). Stockman's editor at Harper & Row, Harriet Rubin, who is working on the book for spring publication, would only say yesterday, "Books often come in well above the anticipated number of words. It is part of the normal process to prune and shape. Several points you raise are no longer relevant. I can't say what they are since the content of the book is confidential." End Notes

Watch for the ringside announcer in "Rocky IV" named Warner Wolf. You aren't mistaken; it is your CBS television sportscaster Warner Wolf . . . And in the same movie, U.S. News & World Report has a cameo role. A photograph of Rocky Balboa appears on the magazine's cover in the movie. U.S. News seems an unlikely choice for such a cover. Elephants would be flying before such a cover would ever appear on the newsstands . . .

No one can ever deny that American University President Richard Berendzen is an operator. The flamboyant Berendzen is on the cover of the December Washington Dossier magazine with his wife Gail. He is outfitted in a black tie and suit of medieval armor, references to his status as a Washington social lion and to his upcoming book "Is My Armor Straight?" Not only that, but a sizable excerpt from that book, which is described as a year in the life of a university president, is in the December issue of Regardie's magazine. Although Berendzen is not on the cover there, he is photographed inside the magazine with Saudi oil billionaire Adnan Khashoggi, a man Berendzen has turned into a bankroller for American University . . .

Rock singer David Crosby failed to appear at a mandatory court hearing in Dallas Monday to determine whether he should remain free while his convictions for drugs and firearms violations are appealed, and authorities there issued warrants for his arrest. Crosby, a member of the group Crosby, Stills and Nash, was convicted in August 1983 in Dallas on charges of possession of cocaine and possession of a weapon in an establishment licensed to sell liquor. He was sentenced to eight years in prison and has been free on bond pending appeal. His lawyer, Jay Ethington, said he hadn't talked to Crosby in several days but theorized Crosby was afraid he would be sent to jail and "is frightened of the Texas prison system," which is known for inmate violence . . .

Stanford University students are taking the recent Geneva summit another step. Some 500 seniors and the Stanford Daily have suggested inviting Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to give the June commencement address. Stanford President Donald Kennedy said it's "an interesting idea." Students contacting the Soviet Embassy here were told a formal invitation would be considered, but that they should leave the date open in case Gorbachev wasn't available on commencement day June 15. It sounds like the Russians are interested . . .

There's always another list: the best dressed, sexiest, favorite whatever. So why not the "10 Most Wanted Divorced Men"? Harper's Bazaar magazine has listed them in no special order: actors Clint Eastwood, Dudley Moore, Don Johnson and William Hurt; filmmaker George Lucas; designer Calvin Klein; rockers Sting and David Bowie; baseball player Steve Garvey; and playwright Sam Shepard. They may be wanted, but most of these guys have some pretty serious commitments already.