TV Ratingzzz

CBS, aided by the "Kane & Abel" mini-series, Part I of "Doubletake" and President Reagan's speech before a joint session of Congress on Thursday (which snatched about 45 big-audience minutes out of the NBC schedule that night), won the week . . .

CBS won Monday, Tuesday, Friday and Sunday nights and finished with an 18.0 rating and a 27 percent share. NBC, taking Thursday and Saturday, had a 17.8/27, and ABC, winning Wednesday, had a 14.7/22 . . .

So far first-place NBC has won five weeks, while second-place CBS and ABC have both won two . . .

Skipping down the list of 61 programs ranked for the week ending Nov. 24, "Dumbo" on NBC tied for 21st place; ABC's Ewoks movie tied for 26th; and Part I of NBC's "Mussolini: The Untold Story" was 28th . . .

NBC's "Bridge Across Time," which proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that David Hasselhoff is a lot more relaxed chatting up his dashboard than he is astride a real, live horse, tied for 41st . . .

CBS' "Lost in London," with Emmanuel Lewis, could do no better than 46th, while ABC's "American Video Awards" finished 48th . . .

CBS' Saturday night movie, "Chase," was 53rd and the CBS special "We Are the World: A Year of Giving" was 54th . . .

In the Final Five last week were NBC's "Punky Brewster" in 57th, followed, in order, by an ABC news analysis of the Geneva summit; ABC's "Hollywood Beat"; ABC's "Shadow Chasers"; and ABC's already canceled "Our Family Honor," which finished in a dishonorable 61st place . . . Also in the News

Channel 5 coanchor James Adams quietly returned to the 10 o'clock news Monday night after more than three weeks' absence due to a Nov. 1 traffic accident . . .

Adams suffered a hairline fracture of the hip and viewers could notice a slight scar above one eyebrow as a result of the car crash . . .

News Director Betty Endicott said yesterday that the painful hip injury will prevent Adams from covering news stories for another couple of weeks but said that Adams feels he can handle an hour each night on the news desk . . .

A week ago, Channel 5 revealed on its evening newscast that Alexandria police have filed a driving-while-intoxicated charge against Adams as a result of the early morning accident, in which his car veered out of control and struck two traffic islands and a tree on Commonwealth Avenue . . .

"Not so long ago, in a studio far, far away from the policymakers in Washington, D.C., George Lucas conceived of an imaginary galaxy where fantastic creatures and courageous knights battled an evil empire with spaceships, 'Blaster' guns and light sabers" . . .

That's the way U.S. District Court Judge Gerhard Gesell yesterday began his memorandum announcing his decision to dismiss complaints filed by Lucasfilm Ltd. against two Washington-based groups, one of which supports President Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), while the other opposes SDI, and both of which used the popular phrase "Stars Wars" to describe SDI in competing TV ads recently on the eve of the Geneva summit . . .

Gesell's memorandum goes on to explain that "through persistent and prolific use in newspapers and magazines and over television and radio the phrase star wars has become a popular synonym for the SDI proposal" . . .

Lucasfilm Ltd. had sought to enjoin the groups' use of the phrase, alleging trademark infringement, unfair competition, misappropriation, disparagement and a "number of other similar business torts" . . .

Gesell ruled that "plaintiff has no property right in the use of words commonly found in the English language. It is well established that the property right conferred by a trademark is very limited" . . .

" . . . the use of star wars," he wrote, "in political propaganda, newspapers or noncommercial, non-trade references will not undermine plaintiff's exclusive property right to use it in connection with goods and services. The words 'star' and 'wars' were in the common domain before plaintiff established its service mark and plaintiff's efforts gave 'Star Wars' a special, secondary meaning" . . .

The pro-SDI defendants in the Lucasfilm suit were the Coalition for the Strategic Defense Initiative, which with Ringe Media Inc. of Washington produced the ad for codefendant High Frontier, the key SDI advocacy group . . .

The anti-SDI defendants were the Committee for a Strong, Peaceful America, Robert Squier's The Communications Company and Richard Pollock Associates . . .

John Terenzio, who has been national news manager for ABC News in New York, has left the network to become news director of WPLG in Miami . . .

He replaces Steve Wasserman, who has been named news director of WCBS in New York . . .

No replacement for Terenzio has been named . . .

ABC Entertainment has a movie in the works confronting the abortion issue. "Choices" stars George C. Scott as a retired judge who goes into a swivet when he learns both his second, beautiful young wife (Jacqueline Bissett) and his unmarried, teen-age daughter (Melissa Gilbert) are pregnant . . .